Understanding Human Institutions and Behaviors

OVERVIEW:

This document provides a description of the Understanding Human Institutions and Behaviors component of University Studies.  In so doing, it differentiates between common component-level student learning outcomes and discipline-specific course-level learning outcomes, offering examples of both types.  The goal is to encourage the development of challenging and varied University Studies courses that share common assessable student learning outcomes.

PART I: DESCRIPTION AND RATIONALE

This component of the University Studies program includes courses that examine the social institutions and processes that are essential for understanding human societies.  The solutions to major contemporary societal problems require broad knowledge of the origins, mechanisms, and consequences of behavioral and social change. A basic understanding of the roles of individuals and institutions in the development and implementation of the cooperative policies that will lead to a sustainable future will make students better-prepared global citizens.  Courses in the Understanding Human Institutions and Behaviors component will introduce students to the major research methodologies used in the social and behavioral sciences, foster critical thinking skills, and relate major findings and principles to public policies. 

PART II: COMMON STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES ALIGNED TO UNIVERSITY STUDIES GOALS

The following are the Common Student Learning Outcomes for Understanding Human Institutions and Behaviors. These are aligned with the UNCW Learning Goals. Each course in this category must address all of the Common Student Learning Outcomes for the category, and list these Common SLOs along with course-specific SLOs in the course syllabus. Proposals for inclusion in the category will describe the opportunities which will be provided for students to learn the outcome (readings, class discussion and/or activities, applied projects) and list the specific sources of evidence (exams, papers, projects, quizzes, etc.) that will be used to determine the level of student understanding.

The student will:

  •  HIB 1. Describe and explain major terms, concepts, methods, and principles in at least one of the social and behavioral sciences. [Foundational Knowledge]
  • HIB 2. Evaluate the quality of social scientific information, including differentiating empirical evidence from speculation and the probable from the improbable. [Information Literacy, Critical Thinking]
  • HIB 3. Demonstrate the ability to integrate scientific principles and evidence to resolve conflicting claims in the social and behavioral sciences. [Critical Thinking]
  • HIB 4. Articulate how the social and behavioral sciences can provide explanations of social issues and inform public policy. [Critical Thinking, Global Citizenship]

PART III: STUDENT COMPLETION REQUIREMENTS

Students are required to take six hours from this component, including at least two courses with different prefixes.


UNC Wilmington | 601 S. College Road, Wilmington NC 28403 | 910.962.3000 | About this Site | Copyright Notice | Feedback | Page maintained by:  L. Bullard [ bullardlr AT uncw DOT edu ]