CHHS Students Display Research Posters at 2017 UNCW Fall Student Research and Creativity Showcase

CHHS Students Display Research Posters at 2017 UNCW Fall Student Research and Creativity Showcase

On Nov. 20 and 21, CHHS students from the School of Social Work and School of Health and Applied Human Sciences displayed their research at the 2017 UNCW Fall Student Research and Creativity Showcase.

Sponsored by UNC Wilmington’s Center for the Support of Undergraduate Research and Fellowships (CSURF), the Honors College, Graduate School, Office of Undergraduate Studies, ETEAL, Academic Affairs and Randall Library, the posters represent important discoveries in the arts, sciences, humanities and professional areas.

Congratulations to the CHHS students listed below for their representation and achievement!

Please note, posters are listed in the order as they appear in the Fall 2017 CSURF Showcase Booklet.

Poster #3

Primary Author: Jade Apostolico Undergraduate Student
Co-authors: Phillip Tippett
School/College: College of Health and Human Services
Department/School: Social Work
Faculty Supervisor: Jacquelyn Lee
Health
SURCA PROJECT

MINDFULNESS IN HIGHER EDUCATION: THE POWER OF PRESENCE FROM THE CLASSROOM TO THE COMMUNITY

A promising but underdeveloped area of research, many small-scale studies suggest a myriad of ways that mindfulness can benefit the individual and society. Inclusive of a review of current literature, this project aims to outline the benefits of mindfulness practice to higher education in relation to the learning process, students, instructors, and university culture. Broader implications for society are discussed.

Poster #1

Primary Author: Jacob Bowie Undergraduate Student
Co-authors: Robert Benton and Haley Williams
School/College: College of Health and Human Services
Department/School: Health and Applied Human Sciences
Faculty Supervisor: Wayland Tseh
Health

ASSESSING MUSCULAR FATIGUE VIA SURFACE ELECTROMYOGRAPHY DURING DYNAMIC KNEE EXTENSIONS

Exercise to fatigue at different loads has been reported to elicit similar gains in strength and hypertrophy if exercise is taken to momentary muscle failure (MMF). The proposed mechanism is speculated to be due to variation in the activation patterns of the muscles involved. PURPOSE: To examine the effect of exercise at two different loads through surface electromyography (sEMG).

METHODS: Thirty participants (Age = 21.7 ± 3.4 yrs; Height = 170.5 ± 8.3 cm; Body Mass = 69.9 ± 14.8 kg) conducted an initial 1-repetition maximum (1-RM) testing session followed by exercise to MMF in two separate sessions set at least 48 hours apart in a random order. Surface electromyography signals were collected during dynamic knee extensions to fatigue at a load of 40% and 70% 1-RM, respectively, from the Vastus Medialis of both the dominant and non-dominant leg. For both conditions, random intercept and slope models were the best fitting. RESULTS: There were significant linear increases in amplitude with an increase in repetitions for both conditions. The slope for the 70% 1-RM conditions was greater than the 40% 1-RM condition. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that the amplitude varies directly

with number of repetitions completed and at the 70%1-RM condition the amplitude increases were greater. The absolute relative average amplitude of the 70%1-RM condition was also higher indicating greater muscle activation as inferenced from sEMG activity.

Poster #5

Primary Author: Samantha Carroll Undergraduate Student
School/College: College of Health and Human Services
Department/School: Recreation Therapy
Faculty Supervisor: Candy Ashton
Environment

ABILITY GARDEN NEEDS ASSESSMENT

The Ability Garden is the Therapeutic Horticulture program of the New Hanover County Arboretum. As part of the Ability Garden's 2017-2020 Strategic Plan, it is engaging in a community wide needs assessment to determine what adapted horticulture programs and services are needed/wanted by citizens with disabilities of New Hanover County. Both in-person interviews and an online survey were utilized to collect data from stakeholders, such as special education, and assisted living and long-term care facilities, health care facilities, and programs for youth-at-risk. Nine agencies were contacted via phone, sixteen agreed to be interviewed, one agreed to complete the on-line survey, one declined to participate, and fourteen never responded to the requests. Results indicated the stakeholders felt that therapeutic horticulture programs could increase their clients'/students'/residents' social skills, job and academic skills, quality of life, and independence and community integration. Most wanted services brought to their facilities. The community-based agencies that served adults requested information to give their clients about programs offered at the Ability Garden.

Poster #40-B

Primary Author: Joshua Slocumb Undergraduate Student
Co-authors: Yvonne Marsan and Derek Detweiler
School/College: College of Health and Human Services
Department/School: Earth and Ocean Sciences
Faculty Supervisor: Eman Ghoneim
Environment
SURCA PROJECT

USING GEOSPATIAL TECHNOLOGY AND FIELD SURVEY TO ASSESS THE EFFECTS CLIMATE CHANGE HAS ON CARBON STOCKS AND LOCAL WETLANDS, NEW HANOVER COUNTY

With the high frequency of coastal storms, the Wrightsville Beach barrier island acts as a buffer in preventing floodwaters and storm surges from reaching the very near mainland. The wetlands that back the island also act as a buffer while preforming vital processes such as decomposition of biomass, and filtration of water. An investigation was conducted to analyze the effects that climate change has on the backwater wetlands of the northern half of Wrightsville Beach. This work investigates the potential impact of current and accelerating sea level rise rates on the coastal wetland habitats in Wrightsville Beach using the simple bathtub, and the Sea Level Affecting Marshes Model (SLAMM) approaches. Dominant wetland species were mapped from very high-resolution WorldView-2 imagery through the hybrid classification algorithm. Spectral measurements were collected at the study site using a, fieldradiometer, to assist in the validation of the derived classification map.

Poster #2

Primary Author: Rachel Williams Undergraduate Student
Co-authors: Ryan Swiezy, Maddison Patterson, Rachel McCormick, Blair Bonner, Amber Ausley, Raechel Santee, Aubrey Burgess, Virginia Wilson and Hayley Grimes
School/College: College of Health and Human Services
Department/School: Health and Applied Human Sciences
Faculty Supervisor: Wayland Tseh
Health

FITNESS-RELATED BENEFITS: LAND-BASED VERSUS AQUA-BASED

PURPOSE: To compare fitness-related benefits between land-based (LAND) versus aqua-based (AQUA) courses.

METHODS: Informed consent was received from 154 volunteers (N = 76 LAND; N = 78 AQUA). Pre- and post-fitness assessments obtained were body composition, muscular endurance, muscular strength, cardiorespiratory endurance, and flexibility. RESULTS: Mixed ANOVA was used to investigate mean differences between pre-and post-fitness assessments and between groups. Individuals participating in land-based courses displayed greater decreases in percent body fat when compared to aqua-based courses, whereas both land- and aqua-based displayed improvements in muscular strength and muscular endurance. There were no changes in cardiorespiratory endurance and flexibility within both groups.