Department of English

Cristina Garcia, bestselling author and National Book Award finalist, reads from her latest novel, The Lady Matador's Hotel, as part of the Buckner Lecture series in March 2012. UNCW Photo by Katherine Freshwater

Undergraduate Course Descriptions

Spring 2018

ENG 202-001 | MW 3:30–4:45
ENG 202-002 | TR 3:30–4:45
Introduction to Journalism
Rory Laverty
BR 160
Prerequisite: ENG 103 or ENG 201, or consent of instructor. Introduction to news values, style, and writing. Focus is on current event literacy, writing news stories under deadline pressure, interviewing, investigating, and feature writing. Partially satisfies University Studies IV: Building Competencies/Writing Intensive. Partially satisfies University Studies IV: Building Competencies/Information Literacy. Satisfies University Studies V: Explorations Beyond the Classroom.

ENG 202-003 | MWF 9:00–9:50
ENG 202-004 | MWF 10:00–10:50
Introduction to Journalism
Shirley Mathews
Bear 160
Go beyond the mundane "who, what, where, when and why" of journalism and, over the semester, discover the fact that remains as true today as when the Founding Fathers raised Freedom of Speech as a fundamental right: One person telling the truth can indeed change the world. Extensive practice in the basics of writing news stories, instruction in how a newsroom works, training in how to look for stories and the importance of accuracy, accuracy, accuracy. Roll up your sleeves, put on your good shoes and prepare to walk in the footsteps of giants. Texts include Melvin Mencher’s News Reporting and Writing and The Associated Press Stylebook 2016 or newer.

ENG 204-001
ENG 204-003
ENG 204-004
Introduction to Professional Writing
Amanda Coyne
Online
Introduction to Professional Writing is an introductory survey of concepts in professional writing, including audience analysis, research methods, visual thinking, and the composing process. This course includes a service-learning component. This is an online course.

ENG 204-002
Introduction to Professional Writing
Anthony Atkins
Online*
The course will introduce students to strands of Professional Writing like document design, resume writing, and using multimedia. Students will also review and evaluate a number of online and traditional texts ranging from websites to professional reports. While students will work with traditional documents, they will also address multimedia's impact on professional writing. This course also requires a Service/Applied Learning component. This means students will work with a client in the community to apply what they learn in the course. Students should have access to the Internet and Blackboard. Students should have basic technology skills (adept with email, attachments, blackboard, etc.).
*Access to Blackboard and the Internet for the full semester is required.
*There are no required face-to-face meetings.

ENG 204-005 | MW 11:00–11:50; F online
Introduction to Professional Writing (hybrid)
Michelle Manning
BR 160
How do you get a job if you lack experience? How can you demonstrate to employers that you possess the necessary writing skills needed to fulfill their communication needs? ENG 204 is designed to help you begin to navigate the demands of the workplace and provides an opportunity to participate in a writing project to gain useful experience. This hybrid course, which complements all majors, will meet Mondays and Wednesdays. Using a reader-centered approach to professional writing, you will explore the techniques and strategies in writing effectively. This course covers the basics of writing and designing, ranging from resumes and cover letters to a capstone service-learning writing project for a client or agency. Textbook: Technical Communication: A Reader-Centered Approach, 9th edition, Paul Anderson.

ENG 204-006 | MW 10–10:50; F online
Introduction to Professional Writing (hybrid)
Christa Weaver
BR 202
This course will give students an introduction to various areas of professional writing. Using print and online mediums, students will learn how to design persuasive and purposeful texts as they compose, format, research, critique, and revise business documents. This course will also include group collaboration and a service learning component to afford students the opportunity to acquire new perspectives, overcome workplace challenges, and enhance problem-solving skills.

ENG 204-007 | MW 12:00–12:50; F online
Introduction to Professional Writing (hybrid)
Michelle Manning
MO 204
How do you get a job if you lack experience? How can you demonstrate to employers that you possess the necessary writing skills needed to fulfill their communication needs? ENG 204 is designed to help you begin to navigate the demands of the workplace and provides an opportunity to participate in a writing project to gain useful experience. This hybrid course, which complements all majors, will meet Mondays and Wednesdays. Using a reader-centered approach to professional writing, you will explore the techniques and strategies in writing effectively. This course covers the basics of writing and designing, ranging from resumes and cover letters to a capstone service-learning writing project for a client or agency. Textbook: Technical Communication: A Reader-Centered Approach, 9th ed., Paul Anderson.

ENG 204-008 | T 11:00–12:15; R online
ENG 204-009 | T 3:30–4:45; R online
Introduction to Professional Writing (hybrid)
Jeremy Tirrell
MO 204
Students in this course will engage core professional writing concepts including audience analysis, document design, usability, and ethical composing practices. Students will produce materials such as public relations documents and technical instructions in multiple formats. Individual and group projects are a feature of this course, as is directed service learning with community partners. This is a hybrid course. During most weeks, students will meet once in a classroom and have one online instruction session. Students must be comfortable with sustained, independent online interaction to succeed in this course.

ENG 205-001 | TR 11:00–12:15
Introduction to Literary Studies
Dan Noland
MO 205
Why do you want to study approaches to literature? That question you will mull and eventually answer in detail. You will develop a rich relationship with literature, learning and applying vocabularies and methods of literary theory and criticism, performing close readings and analyses of primary texts and secondary source materials, developing a writerly voice and understanding conventions of literary criticism and research. Text: The Norton Anthology of King Lear; others will be posted online.

ENG 205-003 | TR 9:30–10:45
Introduction to Literary Studies
Keith Newlin
MO 106
How does one find something interesting and informative to say about a work of literature? And how does one convey that interpretation effectively in writing? This course seeks to answer those two questions by introducing students to the methods of literary criticism and by providing an opportunity for detailed attention to the process of writing and revision. We will begin by examining a variety of interpretive strategies for reading literature; and then we will write a series of papers applying what we have learned to several literary works. Texts: The MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers, 8th ed.; Sophie Treadwell, Machinal; Kate Chopin, The Awakening.

English 209-001 | TR 9:30–10:45
Classical Literature in Translation
Lewis Walker
MO 208
The classical writings of ancient Greece and Rome are still very much alive in the multiple ways they have influenced our culture. We will sample a rich variety of texts that still speak to us today, including Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey (courage, heroism, living by one’s wits, wandering and returning home); tragedy by Sophocles (Oedipus the King [physical and mental blindness; incest; patricide); philosophy by Plato (Symposium [especially the nature of love]); comedy by Aristophanes (Lysistrata [sex as an antidote to war], lyric poetry by Catullus (celebration of and cynicism about forbidden heterosexual love) and Sappho (lesbian love); Virgil’s epic The Aeneid (duty to the gods vs. passionate personal love); Ovid’s Metamorphoses (memorable accounts of the transformations of form that take place in classical myths). We will also give some attention to the influence of classical works on later literature and on our culture today. Reading quizzes, class participation, written responses, two tests.

ENG 210-001 | TR 11:00–12:15
Mythology
Victor Malo-Juvera
MO 100
Obi-Wan Kenobi, Dumbledore, and Gandalf the Grey all die in almost identical scenes. In Harry Potter, Fluffy is lulled to sleep by music. In Game of Thrones, Lyanna Stark is abducted by a Targaryen prince, and Stannis Baratheon sacrifices his daughter on advice from the Red Woman. All of the aforementioned scenes can be traced back to ancient myths and this course will examine the underlying mythic structure of modern works of literature and popular culture. Specifically, we will study of the mythic structure of the hero’s journey and through readings of Greek, Roman, and Norse mythology, critically interrogate multiple myths.

ENG 211-001 | TR 8:00–9:15
British Literature to 1800
Dan Noland
MO 104
This course will consider the enduring literary and cultural legacy of such major figures and works as “Beowulf,” Geoffrey Chaucer, Sir Thomas More, John Milton, and Samuel Johnson and less familiar, though nonetheless significant, figures as Mary Astell, and Lady Mary Wortley. Over fifteen weeks, we will encounter major barnyard mayhem, diabolical contracts gone bad, demonic delinquents on a tear, and, for better or worse, the full simmering broth of human emotion. Throughout the course, we will further consider strategies of interpretation, literary devices and conventions, and matters of literary form and genre.

ENG 212-001 | TR 3:30–4:45
British literature Since 1800
Lewis Walker
MO 208
This course is a survey of significant short works of English Literature from roughly the past 220 years. The three periods (Romantic, Victorian, and Twentieth Century and After) into which our book divides this work include poetry and prose of enormous diversity and richness. Types of literature covered include poems, short stories, a short novel, and essays. In addition to analyzing the individual works read, we will give attention to the cultural and historical context of those works. Authors include William Wordsworth, John Keats, Matthew Arnold, Robert Louis Stevenson, Virginia Woolf, Katherine Mansfield, James Joyce, T. S. Eliot., and Seamus Heany. Reading quizzes, class participation, three tests.  

ENG 223-001 | TR 3:30–4:45
American Literature to 1870
Mike Wentworth
MO 104
American Literature to 1870 examines the work of American authors from the 16th through the 19th century from literary, historical, and aesthetic perspectives, noting patterns and breaks in chronological trajectories. While the course focuses on the aesthetics of different literary genres, it also situates texts within historical and national contexts, including exploration and colonization, 18th-century and revolutionary writings, and the Romantic era. Students learn to appreciate and to analyze a variety of American literary texts, hone their critical reading skills, sharpen their essay-writing skills through the practices of outlining, drafting, and revising, creating original, sustained, thoughtful, and persuasive arguments, and improve their communication skills in writing and class discussions.

ENG 224-001 | TR 11:00–12:15
American Literature Since 1870
Keith Newlin
MO 106
In this course we will read representative short fiction (and a novel), plays, and poems in American literature from the late 1900s to the present. We will discover how and why each story “works”—how it captures the reader’s interest, the aesthetic methods the authors use to tell their story. We will also look at the political, social, and cultural context; and we will discuss such issues as emerging feminism, critical responses to racism, the literature of propaganda, alienation and literary experiment, and why some writers get represented in anthologies and others do not. This section will also emphasize critical discussion and writing. Text: William Cain, ed., American Literature, Vol. 2, 2nd ed. (Penguin Academics).

ENG 226-001 | MWF 10:00–10:50
World Literature Since 1600
Jennifer Lozano
MO 106
Travel the world through the pages of literature! In this class we will read some of the most acclaimed literary works (in translation) from around the world including Japan, Argentina, France, Germany, Mexico, and beyond. In doing this, students will hone both their knowledge of literary terms and analysis, as well as develop their awareness and appreciation of different histories, political contexts, cultures, and religions. Finally, as a class we will strive to develop and respond to the long debated question: “what is world literature?” This course partially satisfies University Studies II: “Aesthetic, Interpretive, and Literary Perspectives;” it satisfies University Studies II: “Living in a Global Society;” and it partially satisfies University Studies IV: “Writing Intensive.”

ENG 227-300 | MWF 1:00–1:50
HON: World Anglophone Literatures
Michelle Britt
MO 202
Anglophone is defined as: “An English-speaking person, especially one in a country where two or more languages are spoken.” This theme based Literature course will examine various fiction and non-fiction pieces written in English from a range of Caribbean Islands. We will explore the cultural nuances associated with the works and their relationships to individual and collective identity. Students will study a variety of literatures and genres from the Caribbean region. Counts towards Writing Intensive and Global Perspectives.

ENG 230-001 | TR 12:30–1:45
Women in Literature
Amanda Coyne
MO 205
In this course we will explore classical and contemporary women writers. We will look at a variety of genres, time periods, and perspectives to discuss and analyze the many ways women are represented and represent themselves. Along with looking at more traditional genres such as poetry and novels, we will also explore how popular culture impacts how women are (and are not) represented. As we analyze these texts we will also explore issues such as women in the economy, gender identity, women's rights, motherhood, class, and race (among others).

ENG 230-002 | W 3:30–6:15
Women in Literature
Katie Peel
MO 106
In this course we will examine literary representations of women by authors who at some point identify as women or trans.* We will begin with the introduction to Sandra Gilbert and Susan Gubar’s landmark work, The Madwoman in the Attic, as well as Virginia Woolf’s “A Room of One’s Own” and Alice Walker’s “In Search of our Mothers’ Gardens,” and discuss the cultural, economic, and political factors that historically have affected western women’s writing. Our course this semester will explore the theme of hunger and how various hungers inspire and are reflected in women’s writing. We will explore multiple genres, and look at how women create narrative about gendered experiences. We will consider factors including class, sexuality, race, gender identity, modes of production, and social justice activism. Our work together will not seek to reduce women’s writing to a common denominator of qualities, but rather, explode existing categories. *Our study will be inclusive of trans and nonbinary gender identities. Historically, to not be classified as male in American and British culture tended to automatically mean classification as female. We will bring a broader understanding of gender to our exploration of writing in a patriarchal culture.

ENG 230-003 | MW 3:30–4:45 pm
Women in Literature
Katherine Montwieler
MO 206
What is it about this late eighteenth-century writer that makes her so popular in the twenty-first century?  Blushing heroines, sex games, economic insecurity, and warring families transcend class, national, and temporal boundaries—in this course we’ll read several of Jane Austen’s novels, including (most likely) Pride and Prejudice, Sense and Sensibility, and Emma, and contemporary adaptations or homages to their creator, including A Good Indian Wife, Pride and Prejudice and Zombies, and Jane in Austin.  We’ll also watch, analyze, critique, and enjoy film and internet sensations inspired by Austen, including (perhaps) The Lizzie Bennet Diaries, Clueless, Bride and Prejudice, Austenland, and The Jane Austen Fight Club.

ENG 231-001 | TR 9:30–10:45
Theory and Practice of Hip-Hop
Alex Porco
MO 100
In the early 1970s, hip-hop emerged as a local cultural practice in the South Bronx, a neighborhood devastated by unemployment, drugs, and escalating gang violence, as well as the city’s disinvestment in education and general neglect of citizens. Today, hip-hop’s a multi-million dollar industry with a truly global reach. Everything from haute couture fashion to professional sports and comic books are touched in some way by the music and culture. Our challenge is to think critically about the significant aesthetic, linguistic, economic, political, and technological contributions and transformations of hip-hop music and culture over the last thirty years. We will attend closely to hip-hop’s four elements—rapping, deejaying, graffiti, and break dancing—as well as key figures, periods, and genres. Other topics we will address include: gangsta rap and moral panic in the late 1980s; the contributions of women to the production of hip-hop; and the emergence of hip-hop cinema, television, and literature. The focus of the course is the period from 1973 to 1994. The design of the course is necessarily interdisciplinary because hip-hop is interdisciplinary. Therefore, students should be prepared to engage with materials from fields as diverse as sociology, history, music, literary studies, cultural studies, education studies, dance, and film.

ENG 290-001 | TR 3:30–4:45
Themes in Literature: Horror
Nick Laudadio
MO 205
In this class we will be focusing our energies on the genre affectionately known as “horror.” Our survey will be historically situated and cover a great deal of ground, both chronologically and culturally. We will watch films and television, read novels and short stories, write essays and research and annotated bibliographies all in an effort to not only better understand what is one of the most commercially successful genres out there, but also to hone our critical thinking and writing skills along the way. As horror is a broad genre, we will need to limit our purview a bit. So, though there will be some time spent at the beginning of the semester giving historical context to the genre and reading some of its proto works (Edgar Allan Poe, Lovecraft, etc.), we will spend the bulk of the semester looking at texts that deploy witches and witchcraft as a means to scare you silly.

ENG 290-002 | M online; W 3:30–4:45
Themes in Literature: A Return to Union: Yogic Teachings in Contemporary Literature (Hybrid)
Rebecca Warfield
MO 201
Before Lululemon, hot yoga, beer yoga, and Namaste in bed memes, yoga was solely a spiritual practice. Ancient yogis spent their days meditating and studying to achieve yoga. The term yoga stems from the Sanskrit word yuj which means "to yoke." The goal of yoga, then, is to reduce division within the Self so that the yogi can find union within the whole of existence.

One way in which yogis achieve such union is through the study of books. In fact, sutra 2.44 in The Yoga Sutra of Patanjalisvadhyaya ishta samprayogah—states, “By study of spiritual books comes communion with one’s chosen deity.” Yogis believe that the deity is a representation of the Self. Thus, to read and study books of philosophical significance, one can come closer to the goal of yoga: a return to the union of Self.

The yogi's desire for union has been passed down for thousands of years within the literary tradition. For instance, Thoreau and Emerson are often credited with weaving yoga's teachings and the "return to union" into American literature. But long before and after Thoreau and Emerson, writers across the globe have studied and practiced yoga. As such, the teachings of yoga have deeply influenced the language and letters of many contemporary authors.

In this class, we will examine various contemporary works of literature that embody the teachings of yoga. Though the emphasis of this class will be contemporary literature, students can also expect to read and learn the basic tenets of yogic philosophy. Students in this class do not need an asana (physical yoga) practice to participate.

ENG 290-003 | MWF 9:00–9:50
Themes in Literature: Louisiana in Literature and Media
Maia Butler
MO 106
We know Louisiana. At least we think we do. We see Louisiana on the news every hurricane season. We see Louisiana in music videos and hear Louisiana on the radio. We have seen Louisiana’s people and landscapes in TV and in the movies, and read about them in books. We may have even traveled there or lived there—had subjective, personal experiences. But are these depictions the “real” Louisiana? What does “real” even mean? In this course, we will question the idea of authenticity and engage with politics of representation all semester. We will engage with novels and shorter works, television and movies, music and other cultural productions, and think about how representations (depictions or portrayals) of Louisiana reveal issues of class and gender, race and nation, and are motivated at times by economics and politics. Who gets to write, direct, display Louisiana? How do they construct these representations? And to what ends?

Anticipated Texts:
The Cutting Season, Attica Locke ∙ Queen Sugar, Natalie Baszile ∙ Orleans, Sherri L. Smith
Additional materials will be provided on PDF

Partially satisfies:
University Studies II: Approaches and Perspectives/Aesthetic, Interpretive, and Literary Perspectives. University Studies IV: Building Competencies/Writing Intensive.

ENG 290-300 | TR 9:30–10:45
Themes in Literature: Evolution of the Vampire (Honors)
Ashley Bissette Sumerel
MO 206
Vampires. From the ghastly, ruthless monster to the sympathetic version with a conscience, these mythological creatures have fascinated readers for centuries. In this course, students will explore the ways in which the vampire myth has evolved, as well as the common themes that occur throughout every vampire story. Students will study vampires in literature, film, and mythology. They will draw connections between these texts, analyzing the implications of vampires across time periods and cultures and discussing the fascination with these timeless monsters. Readings will include short stories and novels from the 1800’s to present time, as well as select critical articles.

ENG 294-001
Buenos Aires: Capital of Culture
Paula Kamenish
Online + Study Abroad
This online course with two-week study abroad component explores representative works of twentieth- and twenty-first-century Argentine writers, painters, and musicians. We will study the writings of authors such as Jorge Luis Borges, Julio Cortázar, and Maria Marta Marciano, the paintings of artists like Césareo Bernaldo de Quirós and Xul Solar, and the music of Argentine folk dance and tango. We will travel to Buenos Aires on May 16 to discover how literature, music, and art reveal the history of the people of Argentina and enrich the culture of its capital city.

The program brochure is available at http://educationabroad.uncw.edu/index.cfm?FuseAction=Programs.ViewProgram&Program_ID=10993 

This course fulfills the University Studies requirement in Explorations Beyond the Classroom. It can also be counted toward the English major or minor.

ENG 302-001 | MWF 10:00–10:50
Journalism Workshop
Kimi Hemingway
MO 104
This course examines the universal elements of great stories and helps students put those elements into practice for narrative journalism. The best works of narrative journalism are stories of real people in real places that tap into universal truths and meaning: “the ineluctable within the everyday,” as writer Mark Kramer puts it. This course will deepen students’ interviewing, reporting, organization and writing skills in order to produce compelling stories for a variety of outlets. Students will study structure, language, voice, character development, sense of place and telling details that bring people, places and events alive on the page—and illuminate a social issue or universal theme. This class will foster a workshop environment in which students can build appreciation and skill sets for this particular journalistic craft.

ENG 303-001 | TR 11:00–12:15
Reading and Writing Arguments
Diana Ashe
BR 202
Do you ever hear someone make a claim and you know—just know—that it’s totally bogus, but you aren’t sure why? Reading and Writing Arguments can help. The course is just what the title says: we’ll be reading (and analyzing and picking apart and dissecting) a variety of arguments, and we’ll be constructing our own arguments with the insight this provides. Because arguments rely for their success on many disparate elements (like structure, tone, context, clarity and evidence, along with the relative receptivity of the audience), we’ll take as our mission the study and mastery of those elements.

ENG 303-002 | TR 9:30–10:45
Reading and Writing Arguments
Jeremy Tirrell
MO 204
This course asks students to analyze the rhetorical strategies of effective written arguments addressing contemporary social and political issues drawn from periodical sources. Students then will compose their own arguments using the insights gained from engaging these materials. Arguments’ effectiveness derives from internal aspects including structure, language choice, and presentation of evidence as well as external aspects such as awareness of audience and context. In this course, students will examine these elements and put them into practice by producing four essays refined through processes of drafting, receiving feedback, and revising.

ENG 304-001 | TR 9:30–10:45
Writing for Teachers
Victor Malo-Juvera
MO 202
This course will introduce theoretical foundations and instructional strategies for teaching writing in secondary schools. We will begin by examining skills such as vocabulary, grammar, brainstorming, prewriting, and basic paragraph structures. We will then address the most frequently encountered/tested writing in secondary schools: narrative, expository/informational, argumentative, and research papers. Techniques such as scaffolding instruction, peer editing/review, alternative forms of assessment, and culturally relevant instruction will play a critical role in this course. We will also examine requirements for on demand standardized writing assessment and discuss how the Common Core State Standards and the new trend in using End of Course tests may impact writing instruction in the future.

ENG 306-001 | MWF 10:00–10:50
Essay Writing
Hannah Abrams
MO 202

“A good essay must have this permanent quality about it; it must draw its curtain round us, but it must be a curtain that shuts us in not out.” — Woolf

Students in this course will explore the compelling form of the familiar essay. Reading may include selections from The Art of the Personal Essay, Best American Essays, The Seneca Review, and The Artful Edit. Expect writers to range from George Orwell to Cheryl Strayed, subject matter to travel from the death of a moth to a man who works as a Macy’s Christmas elf, and style to encompass polemics as well as braided lyrics. Dynamic discussions of the texts will not only generate a shared critical lexicon but also shape us into writers who can, as Frost once said, “trip readers into the boundless.” Workshops and intense revision will yield deliberate, intentional work and marketable editing skills.

“There [is] nowhere to go but everywhere, keep on rolling under the stars.” — Kerouac

ENG 307-001 | MWF 9:00–9:50 am
Composition Theory
Don Bushman
MO 202
This course will offer an in-depth examination of all stages of—and many approaches to—the writing process as it has been theorized and taught. Aside from providing an understanding of the writing process as it has been theorized and applied in classrooms for the last half century, “Composition Theory” is designed to meet the needs of students who are interested in improving both their own writing by providing the opportunity to reflect on their own writing processes. Text: Villanueva, ed. Cross-Talk in Comp Theory.

ENG 308-001 | TR 12:30–1:45
Grant and Proposal Writing
Sarah Hallenbeck
MO 104
In Grant and Proposal Writing you will be introduced to the practical, nuts-and-bolts processes of finding funding to make change happen in the world—whether that change involves sustaining a non-profit organization or funding academic research. You will research, compare, and analyze different funding potential sources in order to write effectively on behalf of an area non-profit organization with which we will partner. Additionally, you will conduct an interview with a grant writer or reviewer, reporting your findings to the class to broaden our sense of the ecology of grant and proposal writing, a precise and useful form of writing that will benefit you no matter where your future leads you.

ENG 310-001 | MW 12:00–12:50; F online
Theory and Practice of Editing (Hybrid)
Shirley Mathews
BR 160
Meets face-to-face on Mondays and Wednesdays; the Friday class is online. Instruction in strengthening the backbone of writing with an emphasis on learning state-of-the-industry layout software. Course work includes extensive practice in the fundamentals of punctuation and grammar, editing, copyediting and rewriting, all done with an eye to preparing work for publication. Privacy and libel law are examined. Texts include: Media Writer's Handbook and The Associated Press Stylebook 2016 or newer.

ENG 312-001 | MW 2:00–2:50; F online
Writing for Business (Hybrid)
Anirban Ray
MO 204
Why enroll in Writing for Business? What do you want, my sixty-second or six-volume answer? You’re right—it depends on how much and what you want to know. Writing for Business is precisely about finding how much your audience in workplace wants and how they want it. It is less about what you know and want to tell and more about what someone else wants to hear. In this sense, the course marks a transition from academic to professional/workplace writing in four major ways:
- Action-oriented: writing that influences actions in your audience
- Collaborative: writing situations will invite you to work in groups to meet real-life workplace challenges
- Genre-orientated: writing that spans across communication channels—memos, resumes, reports, and proposals (traditional); Twitter, podcasts, Wikis, and blogs for business
- Strategic: writing that utilizes various organizational techniques in the writing process
These features will help you to realize and identify the basic goals and objectives of ‘another’ kind of writing that exists when you’re ready to explore the professional space. You will learn to separate between two very important skills in writing: creative and critical skills. According to Peter Elbow, an eminent theorist, we need creative skills to generate ideas, topics, sentences, and words while require critical skills to decide which ones to use. Most often writers are unable to separate the two skills and create miscommunications in reports, proposals, and even in regular emails. Some of the areas we will cover include creating social media resume, writing persuasive messages, and developing social media marketing skills.

ENG 317-001 | TR 2:00–3:15
Writing About Film
Nick Laudadio
MO 206
In this course, we will be exploring the particular problems and opportunities offered by writing about visual media. We will not focus just on “film,” but rather engage with a broad conception of visual media that includes traditional cinema as well as longer-form televisual media—from silent cinema to contemporary blockbusters to retro television and online videos—and we will be reading from an equally broad array of texts: journalistic, critical, historical, and personal narrative. Please note that you will be expected to write four essays, keep up with the reading and reading notes, screen media on your own time, attend class regularly, and participate in discussion. Also note that this is a writing-intensive course.

ENG 318-001 | MW 11:00–11:50; F online
Writing and Activism: Cyberactivism (hybrid)
Anirban Ray
MO 204
The course explores the current and the changing landscape of public discourse in the field of activism through cyberactivism, defining its breadth and boundaries. You will critically analyze the function of new electronic media including multimedia, hypermedia, and social software in facilitating public opinions and reactions. You will examine the Web’s transforming capacity in challenging authoritative claims from academic, governmental, scientific, and other dominant entities. You will further scrutinize a set of enduring issues and tensions in cyberactivism through concepts like cyberculture, Internet studies, electracy, edemocracy, e-procurement, and many others. At the core, the objective is to make sense of the evolving scope of deliberative politics as it gets continually reinvented through creative uses of information technologies.

ENG 319-001 | M 3:30–4:45; W online
Document Design (hybrid)
Colleen Reilly
MO 204
Students in this course learn document design as a contextual and rhetorically situated process. Building on skills learned in ENG 204, students approach document design through research into situated contexts of use and audience-document interactions. Students will analyze the design of existing texts and produce effective print and electronic texts and graphics for a variety of purposes, contexts, and audiences. Projects include developing business cards, logos, product labels, and instructions. The class will also complete a service-learning design project for a designated client.

ENG 321-001 | W 3:30–6:15
Structure of the English Language
Dan Noland
MO 207
In this course you will become an expert in the metalanguage of the structures of English, beginning with those phonological and morphological, but most particularly the syntactic ones. You have been a master of most of those structures since early childhood; we need to concentrate on making this knowledge conscious, giving you the ability to describe what you know and making predictions based on that knowledge. In addition, some of the structures that we deal with may be new to you. This deeper understanding of your language should carry over into several related areas, and learning how to apply syntax to your own interests is one of your responsibilities. You need no special linguistic training to succeed. Text: Lobeck and Denham, Navigating English Grammar.

ENG 323-001 | TR 9:30–10:45
History of the English Language
Dan Noland
MO 205
This course, an introduction to the history of the English language, will focus primarily, though not exclusively, on the Old English period, the one most remote to us now, in order to gain a better understanding of the internal (sounds and structures) and external (social, political and military) manifestations of that history. Our first task is to acquire the abilities necessary to describe and discuss English. This class will demand a great deal of you in time, energy and intellectual curiosity. In return, you'll see English in a new light. This subject is my favorite and is surprisingly fun to study. Text: A Guide to Old English, Mitchell and Robinson, 8th ed.

ENG 333-001 | TR 8:00–9:15
Shakespeare’s Later Plays
Lewis Walker
MO 101
This course will cover six plays selected from the second half of Shakespeare’s career, including representative comedies (Twelfth Night, Measure for Measure), tragedies (Othello, Macbeth), classical plays (Antony and Cleopatra), and romances (The Winter’s Tale). Among other things, we will consider issues of genre, gender, historicity, and power. Reading quizzes, informal response papers, midterm and final exams, oral presentation or performance, and critical paper.

ENG 336-001 | TR 11:00–12:15
British Romanticism
Mark Boren
MO 104
Traditionally, Romantic subjectivity privileges the individual walking alone in Nature considering a transcendent or sublime experience. This cultivation of a solitary, particularly masculine Romantic ego dominates the genre, and we’ll explore that, but we’ll also see how women, slaves, and soldiers exist in the English landscape and the imagination of its inhabitants as well. In this course, we’ll look at how Romantic writers living in England between 1780 and 1830 conceptualize what it means to be human in a beautiful if terrifying world. We’ll read a number of canonical and non-canonical texts, including work by Wollstonecraft, Wordsworth, Byron, the Shelleys, Hemans, and Landon.

ENG 337-001 | TR 3:30–4:45
Victorian Literature: Boldly Going Where No Man Has Gone Before (and it makes us really nervous!)
Katie Peel
MO 106
In this course we will examine British Victorian literature through reading, critical thinking, and writing. The nineteenth century was marked by radical change in many arenas, including science, technology, politics, and class. What began as a time period with gas lamps, horse-drawn carriages, and quill pens, a life we will see in an episode of BBC’s historical reality series Regency House Party, ended with electricity, a subway system, and the typewriter. The literature of this century, of course, also changed. We will begin with the industrial/social problem novel, and end with the “New Woman” writer and character. The nineteenth-century Briton was breaking new ground, and yet along with this pioneering spirit and confidence, according to Walter E. Houghton, came an anxiety that pervaded many aspects of life. While on one hand, the Victorian era became one of opportunity, particularly social mobility, this opportunity was met with fear, doubt, and nostalgia for the past. We will examine these complexities and much more.

ENG 342-001 | MW 2:00–3:15
Transnational Literatures: Refugee Literature
Paula Kamenish
MO 101

This course will focus on the refugee experience of exile and dislocation in the 20th and 21st centuries as seen through the forms of novel, memoir, and film. Our texts will come from an array of nations, cultures, and literary traditions. We will explore five readings together as a class (Cristina García’s magical Dreaming in Cuban from 1992, Somalian writer Nuruddin Farah’s 2005 haunting novel Links, Vaddey Ratner’s 2012 autobiographical story under the Khmer Rouge regime In the Shadow of the Banyan, the 2014 memoir Little Failure by immigrant Soviet Jewish author Gary Shteyngart, and Viet Thanh Nguyen’s Pulitzer Prize-winning spy novel The Sympathizer of 2015), while we share other works through group presentations (by Brecht, Allende, Arenas, Mengestu, Vu Tran, and Loung Ung).

This course fulfills 3 hours of the Diverse Literary Cultures requirement.

Prerequisite: ENG 103, ENG 200, or ENG 201; ENG 204 or ENG 205 recommended.

ENG 344-001 | MWF 12:00–12:50
Latino Voices in American Literature: Latino/a Voices, Latino/a America
Jennifer Lozano
MO 205

This course will examine literature written by US Latina/o authors since 1848, but primarily from the 20th and 21st century. We will begin by reviewing the history and usage of the term “Latina/o,” including the most recent iteration of “Latinx,” to describe America’s largest and highly politicized non-white ethnic group. We then turn to a vibrant selection of short stories, plays, essays, novels, and poetry to consider the way these writings represent a “Latino/a” experience and dialogue with longstanding notions of “American-ness” including individualism, hard work, family, and equality. The texts we study will also highlight the way a growing Latino/a America has impacted discussions of gender, race, and sexuality. This class satisfies University Studies II: “Living in our diverse nation.”

Prerequisite: ENG 103 or ENG 201, ENG 204 or ENG 205

ENG 352-001 | TR 2:00–3:15
American Modernism
Keith Newlin
BR 200
Roughly occurring between 1915 and 1940, American modernism signaled a time of literary experimentation as writers sought to respond to increased industrialism, the insights of psychoanalysis, social disruption brought on by immigration and migration from the American South to the North, and especially the sense of alienation caused by the onset of World War I. Quite simply, American writers' sense of the world underwent a metamorphosis—from the certainties of realism (where writers expressed a confidence in democracy and in plots that mirrored a world that seemed full of purpose) to a sense of dislocation (in which the world now seemed fragmentary and without apparent meaning). Writers such as Hemingway, Stein, Fitzgerald, Faulkner, Eliot, O'Neill, Pound, Williams, Hurston, and many others experimented with new subjects and especially with new methods of rendering experience in their fiction, poetry, and drama. This course introduces students to the chief writers and moments of what many see as the most influential period of American literature. Texts: The Norton Anthology of American Literature, 1914–1945, 9th ed., vol. D; Ernest Hemingway, In Our Time; and other texts via PDF.

ENG 358-001 | MWF 10:00–10:50
African American Literature Since 1945
Maia Butler
MO 101
In this course, we will engage with African American literature from the 1940s to the 1960s, the heyday of realism, naturalism, and modernism; to the Black Arts Era (1960–75); to the contemporary (1970 to the present). We will cover genres such as poetry and music, nonfiction, drama and film, short fiction, and the novel, and we will keep literary criticism and theory close at hand. We will consider the ways that African American literature reflects migration as much rootedness, and innovation as much as influence, and the fact of literary community among authors working to shape a sense of their place in the United States and elsewhere in the African diaspora. We will see African American literature as a tradition that is highly allusive, rife with signification, pastiche, and call and response, and representative of cultural concerns with gendered, classed, and nationalist implications. We will understand African American people as belonging to heterogeneous communities whose concerns, political and artistic, reflect various responses to the cultural moments of particular historical time periods and geographical locations.

Required Materials:
Native Son, Richard Wright
Paradise, Toni Morrison
Create Dangerously: The Immigrant Artist at Work, Edwidge Danticat
Additional materials will be provided on PDF

Satisfies University Studies II: Approaches and Perspectives/Living in Our Diverse Nation
Counts toward Women and Gender Studies and Africana Studies Minor requirements

ENG 364-001 | TR 2:00–3:15
Studies in Poetry: John Ashbery
Alex Porco
MO 101
In September 2016, John Ashbery died at the age of 90. For fifty-plus years, he had been an iconic figure in American poetry. This course is devoted to reading John Ashbery’s poetry closely and thinking about his major contributions to American literature of the post-WWII period. Over the course of the semester, we will attempt to historicize and understand the trajectory of Ashbery’s poetry and poetics from Some Trees (1956) to A Wave (1984). We will give special attention to a few long poems, especially “The Skaters,” “Self-Portrait in a Convex Mirror,” and “A Wave.” (A recent digital edition of “The Skaters” MS will allow students to learn about the relationship between genetic criticism and literary interpretation.) Other topics of discussion will include: the use and value of “difficulty” in poetry; Ashbery’s radical formal experiments, including The Tennis Court Oath (collage), Three Poems (prose), and The Vermont Notebook (collaboration); the New York School of Poetry, especially Ashbery’s friendship with Frank O’Hara; queer poetics; Ashbery’s collages and his art criticism; and, finally, we’ll think about Ashbery’s relationship to what James English calls “the economy of prestige”— that is, what does it mean to be a famous poet in America.

ENG 381-001 | TR 11:00–12:15
Literature for Young Adults
Katie Peel
MO 101
This semester we will explore constructions of both young adult literature and the young adult, with a particular eye towards issues of agency and social justice. We will consider issues of genre (including both fiction and non-fiction), marketing, and, of course, censorship. We will discuss the goals and agendas of young adult literature, especially when it comes to identity formation, and will pay special attention to how young adult literature handles issues of “otherness,” particularly in depictions of gender, race, ethnicity, class, sexuality, ability, and age. Dismissed as “chick lit” or a guilty pleasure for adult readers, young adult literature has a history of grappling with serious, contemporary issues. We will consider this work from the social problem novels of the 1970s and 1980s to contemporary young adult literature, including Teen Vogue and Angie Thomas’ The Hate You Give.

ENG 381-002 | MW 3:30 –4:45
Literature for Young Adults
Meghan Sweeney
MO 104
Throughout the semester, we will examine a broad range of literature, including novels, memoirs, advice books, and graphic narratives about and for adolescents. We will read these texts sympathetically and critically, paying particular attention to the influence of youth culture and popular culture more broadly. Some of the questions that will guide our discussions will include:
• What defines young adult literature?
• What does it mean to be an adolescent in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries according to YA literature? How (and why) are adolescents idealized/villainized/ portrayed “authentically” in YA texts and adult crossover texts—and what might “authentically” mean?
• How do authors for young adults address social concerns about growing up in a variety of social and economic circumstances?
Please note that, while many future educators take this class, this is a literature course rather than a methods class.

ENG 382-001 | TR 9:30–10:45
Ways of Teaching Literature
Michelle Manning
MO 104
You spend time getting a major, but how do you take all that cumulative knowledge gained as a student and translate that knowledge into teaching others? Although part of the teacher licensure program, this course is open to all majors, teaching students of any level or subject, the focus will be on how to use literature to support your subject area. This course provides practical strategies and approaches to prepare anyone who plans to teach—or wonders about teaching—with survival skills. This course is not a literature course. Instead the focus will be on how to use intertexuality, multiple literary perspectives, and other strategies to help you transition from student to teacher.

ENG 384-001 | MW 2:00–3:15
Reading Popular Culture: Comics and Graphic Narratives
Meghan Sweeney
MO 104
“Comics are not prose. Comics are not movies. They are not a text-driven medium with added pictures; they’re not the visual equivalent of prose narrative or a static version of a film. They are their own thing: a medium with its own devices, its own innovators, its own clichés, its own genres and traps and liberties.” — Douglas Wolk, Reading Comics

Using a combination of formal and theoretical approaches, this course will provide students with the critical tools necessary to read the increasingly important (and wily) medium of comics. We will look at the ways that contemporary comics artists have drawn on a broad tradition to create texts that are richly complex and culturally significant. We will think about the many ways comics have been deployed: as journalism, history, humor, memoir, and social critique. Texts may include March 2 (Lewis et al.), 100 Demons (Barry), Stitches (Small), Through the Woods (Carroll) and more.

ENG 387-001 | TR 9:30–10:45
History of Literary Criticism and Theory
Nick Laudadio
MO 101
In this class, we will be exploring the influence that critical and cultural theory has had on the ways we understand literature and culture in the 21st century. Beginning in the mid-19th century and moving through to the present, we will read a broad array of challenging texts that will help us better understand most of the “-isms” we hear so much about—Marxism, structuralism, feminism—as well as many other theoretical approaches to understanding how we humans make things mean things. This is a difficult class, though if you keep up with the reading, note taking, and class discussion, I think you might find it to be a rewarding one. There will be regular reading notes, a midterm, a bibliography, and a final essay.

ENG 390-001 | MWF 1:00–1:50
Studies in Literature: Contemporary American Humor
Mike Wentworth
MO 104
“Laugh, laugh, I thought I’d die / It seemed so funny to me.” (So, okay, to set yourself apart from the “common herd,” name that song and, better yet, name the group. You’ve got the whole course to work on this. Feel free to collaborate. Think of it as a shared learning experience and an exercise in solidarity.)

“Many native traditions held clowns and tricksters as essential to any contact with the sacred. People could not pray until they had laughed, because laughter opens and frees from rigid preconception. Humans had to have tricksters within the most sacred ceremonies lest they forget the sacred comes through upset, reversal, surprise. The trickster in most native traditions is essential to creation, to birth.” (Professor Byrd Gibbens, Professor of English, University of Arkansas at Little Rock [From a letter to George Carlin])

Or in other words,

“Wouldn’t it be great if you could make a guy’s head explode just by looking at him?”

“Sometime when you’re watching a street musician, walk over in the middle of a song and whisper to him that you don’t like his music. Then take a dollar out of his cup and walk away.”

“If it’s true that our species is alone in the universe, then I’d have to say the universe aimed rather low and settled for very little.”

“You know the good part about all those executions in Texas? Fewer Texans.”

“When you’re at someone else’s house, and they leave you alone in a room, do you look in the drawers? I do. I’m not trying to steal anything. I just like to know where everything is.”

“Electricity is just organized lightning.”

“’Coming soon to a theater near you.’ Actually, there is no theater near you. Look around your street. Is there a theater near you?”

“I saw a sign that said, ‘Coming soon—a 24-Hour Restaurant.’ And I thought, Well that’s unusual. Why would they open and close it so quickly? At least try it for a week or two, and see if you can build a clientele.”

George Carlin, “Short Takes” (Napalm and Silly Putty)

“Laughing Matters”

Regardless of the expression “laughing like a hyena,” laughter is supposedly unique to the human species. So it would seem, if only in terms of the human condition, that “laughing matters.” Come to think of it, we all enjoy a good laugh, whether the source of such voluble risibility is an off-color limerick, another befuddling day in the life of Homer Simpson, Cosmo Kramer’s latest “brilliant brain scheme,” the “funny papers,” or, in the case of our course, the manic adolescent escapades of Paul Feig and Jean Shepherd, George Carlin’s irreverent rants on everything under the sun (and moon, for that matter), the assorted true-life misadventures of David Sedaris and Beth Lisick, or Dave Barry’s reflections on the absolutely worst American pop song lyrics ever written—all of which should confirm beyond a doubt that, indeed, “laughter is the best medicine.”

Just to whet your appetite, here’s what reviewers have to say about a number of our featured texts:

“Written in side-splitting and often cringe-inducing detail, Paul Feig [in Kick Me: Adventures in Adolescence] takes you in a time machine to a world of bombardment by dodge balls, ill-fated prom dates, hellish school bus rides, and other aspects of public school life that will keep you laughing in recognition and occasionally sighing in relief that you aren’t him. Kick Me is a nostalgic trip for the geek in all of us.”

“Welcome to the hilarious, strange, elegiac, outrageous world of David Sedaris. In Naked, Sedaris turns the current mania for the memoir on its proverbial ear, mining the exceedingly rich terrain of his life, his family, and his unique worldview—a sensibility at once take-no prisoners sharp and deeply charitable. A tart-tongued mother does dead-on imitations of her young son’s nervous tics, to the great amusement of his teachers; a stint of Kerouackian wandering is undertaken (of course!) with a quadriplegic companion; a family gathers for a wedding in the face of imminent death. Through it all is Sedaris’s unmistakable voice, without doubt one of the freshest in American writing.”

“Beth Lisick started out as a homecoming princess with a Crisco-aided tan and bad perm. And then everything changed. How exactly did this suburban girl next door end up as one of San Francisco’s foremost chroniclers of alternative culture, touring as the only straight woman with a band of punk rock lesbian poets and living in illegal warehouses—all while she managed to get married, buy a house, and have a baby? Lisick explains it all in her hilarious, irreverent memoir Everybody into the Pool. Among Lisick’s true tales are “My Way or the Bi-Way,” in which a series of girl-on-girl fiascos from UC Santa Cruz confirm her suspicions that she’s just a straight girl with a positive attitude who’d give anything the old college try; “The Lowly Hustle,” in which she takes on a litany of odd jobs to make ends meet (‘I was a college student designing my own minimum-wage job’); and the endearing story of her ‘courtship’ with her now husband Eli, who impresses her with a spastic rendition of a song called ‘The Wack-Ass Caucasian Two Step Chicken’ and invites her to his Mission District warehouse space—a world of feral raccoons and exploding sewage pipes. (It’s clear to Lisick that he’s ‘The one’).”

“When funnyman Dave Barry asked readers about their least favorite tunes, he thought he was penning just another installment of his weekly syndicated humor column. But the witty writer was flabbergasted by the response. ‘I have never written a column that got a bigger response than the one announcing the Bad Song survey,’ Barry wrote. ‘More than ten thousand readers voted, and the cards are still coming in.’ Based on the results from Dave Barry’s monumental survey, Dave Barry’s Book of Bad Songs is a compilation of some of the worst songs every written, including such special categories as Teen Death Songs, Songs That People Always Get Wrong, Songs Women Hate, and, of course, Weenie Music. As always, Dave Barry fans will relish this comic writer’s quirky take on whatever subject he approaches. Music buffs, too, will appreciate this humorous stroll through the world‘s worst lyrics. In fact, the only thing wrong with this book is that readers will find themselves unable to stop mentally singing the greatest hits of Garry Puckett.”

One final observation. Don’t let the title of our course mislead you. We’re talking serous business here—everything from such sobering realities as growing up absurd, growing up throwing up, sexual mis(s)-orientation, “lower education,” parenting, gainless employment, and, no less seriously, “neat freaks,” morning and evening people, throwing things out, tipping, New Year’s resolutions, school bullies, sadistic gym teachers, prom night, “dog moments,’ and standing (and standing and standing and standing) in line. So crank up your “risometer” and let’s get started.

Required Texts
Dave Barry, Dave Barry’s Book of Bad Songs
Bill Bryson, A Walk in the Woods: Rediscovering America on the Appalachian Trail
George Carlin, Napalm and Silly Putty
Paul Feig, Kick Me: Adventures in Adolescence
Beth Lisick, Everybody into the Pool: True Tales
David Sedaris, Naked
Jean Shepherd, Wanda Hickey’s Night of Golden Memories and Other Disasters

Written Requirements
In addition to a take-home final, which will constitute 25% of your final grade, you will be expected to produce ten pages of writing, which will constitute 75% of your final grade and which will be weighted proportionally based on the page length of your submitted essays. The focus/occasion for such essays may be critical and/or creative in nature. In the case of critical-analytical options, you might want to focus upon one of our featured humorists, in relation to whose work you might want to examine such aspects as topical focus and range (and what such a focus and range reveals about the author), recurring themes, style, tone, attitude, and self-fashioning (the author’s self-conscious shaping/creation of a distinctive persona). Should you choose to write an extended analysis of a particular humorist, you will no doubt want to draw upon additional unassigned selections by that humorist. Commendatory book-jacket “blurbs” might also provide you with a possible angle on your examination of a particular humorist. Or you might want to provide a comparative analysis of selections by two or more humorists dealing with a related topic—for example, Paul Feig’s and Jean Shepherd’s respective accounts of their high school proms, sexual awakening in selected essays by David Sedaris, Paul Feig, and Beth Lisick, or the role of family in relevant selections by various humorists. Or again, you might want to explore various connections between one our featured humorists and an unassigned humorist—for example, George Carlin and Chris Rock or Richard Pryor; or to explore connections between one of our assigned selections and a humorous film dealing with the same subject—for example, Jean Shepherd’s “Ollie Hopnoodle’s Haven of Bliss” and National Lampoon’s Summer Vacation. On the other hand, you might want to explore a personal connection with one or more of the assigned selections. For example, you might want to revisit a memorable family vacation of your own (for better or worse) in relation to Jean Shepherd’s “Ollie Hopnoodle’s Haven of Bliss,” recall a personal dating fiasco in relation to Beth Lisick’s “Didn’t I Almost Have It All?”, compile and measure your own inventory of “bad songs” against Dave Barry’s Book of Bad Songs, or provide your own personal “reactive-experiential take” on any of the topics addressed by George Carlin in Napalm and Silly Putty (for example, cats and dogs, supermarket shopping, cars and driving, airline travel, advertising, and “euphemistic bullshit”). Aside from exploratory personal connections with various of our assigned selections, you might want to write a humorous essay of your own—a particularly attractive option since we could, perhaps, compile a class anthology of original humor.

ENG 393-001 | TR 2:00–3:15 pm
Writing in Scientific Disciplines
Lance Cummings
BR 202
This course critically examines the current state of science writing in professional academic contexts and explores the multiple practical strategies scientists use to communicate in professional settings. The course asks students to evaluate and propose best practices for texts in academic contexts such as peer-reviewed journals and professional conferences. Extra attention is paid to how writing and texts act rhetorically as tools of knowledge making rather than simple “products” of science. Students exit the course with a base of knowledge that will allow them to develop and strengthen their own professional science writing practices.

ENG 417-001 | MW 1:00–1:50; F online
Research Methods in Professional Writing
Anirban Ray
MO 106
Research improves our understanding of the world we live in by construing new knowledge. This course will introduce you to foundational and current research methods and methodologies (quantitative, qualitative, and mixed) used in professional writing/technical communication to improve your understanding of communicative contexts. The course builds on the assumption that research is ultimately guided by the ability to identify the gap or exigence in existing scholarship, academic practice and in the lived context. We will survey the major contributions to the field with the purpose to develop informed perspectives and generate valuable insights about context, theory, data, and application in research. As the course places a premium on situated learning, the readings will orient you toward designing your own empirical study by applying varying research methods to real-life problems.

ENG 490-001 | TR 12:30–1:45
Topics in Literature: Literary Madness
Mark Boren
MO 106
This course explores the notions and defines the aesthetics of “insanity” evidenced in literary works from the late eighteenth century to the present, with a strong focus on the stylization of madness in the twentieth century. The selections describe a trajectory of cultural fascination with mental and behavioral aberration, documenting the “dark side” of the evolution of the Romantic “ego” and the maturation and commercialization of the gothic as they appear in myriad “disturbed” characters, often written by authors popularly believed to be at least momentarily “insane,” if not pathologically aesthetically unconventional if not perverse. In addition to discovering the nature of the “madness” at work in each of these texts, we’ll seek insight into how these works define “normalcy.” Warning: this course will at times deal with mature themes, and some of the texts contain depictions of graphic violence and sexuality.

ENG 495-001 | W 3:30–6:15
Senior Seminar: Voicing Poetry
Alex Porco
MO 102
This capstone course focuses on the performance of poetry—or, what poet-scholar Charles Bernstein, in Close Listening: Poetry and the Performed Word, calls “audiotexts.” We will consider Dada and Futurist sound poems (e.g., Kurt Schwitters’ Ursonate and Christian Bok’s Cyborg Opera); Caedmon poetry recordings of the 1930s–1950s (e.g., Yeats, Stein, Moore, Eliot, Auden, and Thomas); experimental plays from the Poets Theater movement of the 1950s and 1960s; jazz-poetry collaborations, from Langston Hughes and Charles Mingus’s The Weary Blues to Cecil Taylor’s Chinampas; spoken word recordings by Black Arts Movement poets such as Sonia Sanchez, Nikki Giovanni, and Sarah Webster Fabio; David Antin’s “talk” poems, in the context of both ethnopoetics and stand-up comedy; and hip-hop recordings from 1979 to 1994. Students will consider the dynamic relationship between the written word, aurality, and orality—with some attention paid to the history of transcription practices, including Jerome Rothenberg’s theory of “total translation.” Over the course of the semester, students will develop a critical vocabulary for the analysis of audiotexts and complete a research project that treats audiotexts as formal, material, historical, and institutional artifacts. Please note: students will have the opportunity to interpret, perform, and record poems regularly.

English 495-002 | TR 12:30–1:45
Senior Seminar: Adventures in Shakespeare
Lewis Walker
MO 202
In this course, we will examine intensively four of Shakespeare’s plays, chosen to represent different genres, their sources, and selected criticism about them. The plays are Henry IV, Part 1Julius Caesar; King Lear; and The Tempest. The procedure will be to read the text of a play first and to discuss it thoroughly in one class meeting. For the next two class meetings, we will read selections from the sources and criticism of that particular play; this will give us the opportunity to discuss some key issues regarding the play and should stimulate members of the class to generate ideas for their own research. In addition to analyzing how Shakespeare transformed his source material, we will explore themes like power and politics, love and sexuality, gender, folly, coming of age, and heroism. Oral presentations, class participation, short response papers, bibliography, critical research paper.

ENG 496-001 | TR 2:00pm–3:15
Senior Seminar in Writing and Rhetoric: Writing for Branding, Social Media, and the Web
Anthony Atkins
MO 204
This course will explore the nature of “branding” oneself using only free-to-use tools available on the web. The course will also explore social media from an educational and professional communication perspective. To be sure, social media is also entertainment, but how are businesses and non-profit organizations harnessing the collective intelligence of others to bolster exposure, instigate cost-effective marketing, and publicity? How has the United States considered social media as compared to other countries in the world? What are the best uses of social media and where can social media disrupt professional communication strategies? The course will also investigate and interrogate writing and composing in various online venues. Students will present research and new media projects. Students are also required by the Professional Writing Program to put together a well-rounded portfolio that illustrates the breadth of one’s work while in our Professional Program here at UNCW. Basic knowledge of technology is required: email, blackboard, email attachments, for example. All students must have access to Adobe Creative Cloud provided by UNCW.