Department of English

Cristina Garcia, bestselling author and National Book Award finalist, reads from her latest novel, The Lady Matador's Hotel, as part of the Buckner Lecture series in March 2012. UNCW Photo by Katherine Freshwater

Undergraduate Course Descriptions

Spring 2017


ENG 202-001 | MWF 9:00–9:50
ENG 202-002 | MWF 10:00–10:50
Introduction to Journalism
Shirley Mathews
BR 160
Go beyond the mundane "who, what, where, when and why" of journalism and, over the semester, discover the fact that remains as true today as when the Founding Fathers raised Freedom of Speech as a fundamental right: One person telling the truth can indeed change the world. Extensive practice in the basics of writing news stories, instruction in how a newsroom works, training in how to look for stories and the importance of accuracy, accuracy, accuracy. Roll up your sleeves, put on your good shoes and prepare to walk in the footsteps of giants. Texts include Melvin Mencher’s News Reporting and Writing and The Associated Press Stylebook 2016.

ENG 202-003 | MW 2:00–3:15
Introduction to Journalism
Rory Laverty
BR 160
Prerequisite: ENG 103 or ENG 201, or consent of instructor. Introduction to news values, style, and writing. Focus is on current event literacy, writing news stories under deadline pressure, interviewing, investigating, and feature writing. Partially satisfies University Studies IV: Building Competencies/Writing Intensive. Partially satisfies University Studies IV: Building Competencies/Information Literacy. Satisfies University Studies V: Explorations Beyond the Classroom.

ENG 204-001 | MWF 9:00–9:50
Introduction to Professional Writing
Kate Maddalena
BR 202
This course serves as an introduction to “writing” (conceived of broadly) in the professional setting as well as the academic fields of professional writing and technical communication. It explores strategies for analyzing organizational contexts, including professional audiences, professional purposes for writing, and organizational cultures. Assignments will build skills in document design, writing in multiple modes and media, usability testing to develop more accessible texts, and ethical considerations for communication in professional settings.

ENG 204-002 | MW 12:00–12:50, F online
Introduction to Professional Writing (Hybrid)
Anirban Ray
BR 202
This course prepares you to face workplace challenges that require professional communication skills in terms of writing and presentation. It will enable you to develop critical appreciation for core technical concepts including audience, context, persuasion, and purpose in writing situations with an emphasis on ethics in communication. You will be exposed to writing a variety of business collaterals, such as resumes, memos, proposals and reports in different contexts and for different purposes. Additionally, this course puts a huge emphasis on information design from a visual communication framework and challenges students to create technical documents from a defined visual perspective. Most importantly, you will find opportunities to collaborate with peers to share expertise, knowledge, and experience in a service-learning framework. By the end of this course, you will learn to design effective technical documents to solve problems with attention to text, visuals, format, usability, and citation. Since this class is a hybrid, we will meet face-to-face twice a week and online (asynchronous) once a week.

ENG 204-003 | MW 1:00–1:50, F online
Introduction to Professional Writing (Hybrid)
Anirban Ray
BR 202
This course prepares you to face workplace challenges that require professional communication skills in terms of writing and presentation. It will enable you to develop critical appreciation for core technical concepts including audience, context, persuasion, and purpose in writing situations with an emphasis on ethics in communication. You will be exposed to writing a variety of business collaterals, such as resumes, memos, proposals and reports in different contexts and for different purposes. Additionally, this course puts a huge emphasis on information design from a visual communication framework and challenges students to create technical documents from a defined visual perspective. Most importantly, you will find opportunities to collaborate with peers to share expertise, knowledge, and experience in a service-learning framework. By the end of this course, you will learn to design effective technical documents to solve problems with attention to text, visuals, format, usability, and citation. Since this class is a hybrid, we will meet face-to-face twice a week and online (asynchronous) once a week.

ENG 204-004 | MW 5:00–6:15, F online
Introduction to Professional Writing (Hybrid & Laptop)
Lance Cummings
MO 205
In this class, you will reflect on how rhetoric and visual design can inform effective communication in collaborative and technologically diverse contexts. Using print and online tools, you will explore the composing process through invention, collaboration, audience analysis, and revision. Besides composing traditional professional genres, like memos, proposals, instructions, and public relations materials, you will also reflect on how these can be redesigned and delivered in digital and networked contexts. Consequently, you will be required to experiment with various emerging Web 2.0 technologies, culminating in a major design project purposed for a specific professional audience. This course will enhance your ability to compose well-designed, persuasive, and purposeful texts in a variety of professional and academic contexts. Note: This class is a pilot laptop version, which means you will be required to bring a laptop to each class and do work online.

ENG 204-005 | TR 8:00–9:15
Introduction to Professional Writing
Jennifer Kontny
MO 204
We use writing in our everyday lives to communicate change, give instructions, create relationships. We write to inform, request, offer apologies, lodge complaints, and seek clarification. In this course we will use a rhetorical lens to consider what it means to be an effective, efficient, and ethical composer in the workplace and in our social and civic lives. To do so we will explore a wide array of composing tools and strategies. And we will reflect on how these strategies and tools apply across contexts. Throughout the semester students will work with design software and utilize a variety of media to do workplace research, perform audience analysis, and conduct usability testing. By the end of the semester each student will have compiled a portfolio of work in both digital and print media.

ENG 204-006
ENG 204-007
Introduction to Professional Writing
Anthony Atkins
Online
The course will introduce students to strands of Professional Writing like document design, resume writing, and using multimedia. Students will also review and evaluate a number of online and traditional texts ranging from websites to professional reports. While students will work with traditional documents, they will also address multimedia's impact on professional writing. This course also requires a Service/Applied Learning component. This means students will work with a client in the community to apply what they learn in the course. Students should have access to the Internet and Blackboard. Students should have basic technology skills (adept with email, attachments, Blackboard, etc.).
Access to Blackboard and the Internet for the full semester is required.
There are no required face-to-face meetings.

ENG 204-008
Introduction to Professional Writing
Amanda Cosgrove
Online
Introduction to Professional Writing is an introductory survey of concepts in professional writing, including audience analysis, research methods, visual thinking, and the composing process. This course includes a service-learning component.

ENG 205-001 | TR 9:30–10:45
Introduction to Literary Studies
Katie Peel
MO 102
In this course we will develop the ways in which we respond to narrative. This course will serve as an introduction to not only literary studies, but also theoretical approaches to literature. Through close reading and analysis of various literary genres, students will work on critical thinking, reading, and writing skills. Students will produce a number of essays, as well as present in class.

ENG 205-002 | TR 11:00–12:15
Introduction to Literary Studies
Lee Schweninger
MO 202
This course is an introduction to literary studies and will thus offer you the opportunity to develop your knowledge of how to read, interpret and write about literature. The course has four primary objectives: (1) to introduce you to the field of English studies, including discussions of what you can do with an English degree; (2) to provide you with instruction on how to do research and how to write as a literary scholar; (3) to expose you to general overviews of some prominent approaches to the study of literature; and (4) to enable you to critically examine your own approaches to literature through engagement with primary literary texts. Because this is a writing intensive course, you will be asked to write and submit several formal response essays, argumentative research essays, and to keep an informal reading response journal. You will also be responsible for the readings and class discussions and to take occasional reading quizzes. As this will be a discussion based class, attendance, participation, and attention to the readings will of course be required.
This course partially fulfills the University Studies writing intensive and the information literacy requirements.

ENG 205-003 | TR 8:00–9:15
Introduction to Literary Studies
Dan Noland
MO 208
Why do you want to study approaches to literature? That question you will mull and eventually answer in detail. You will develop a rich relationship with literature, learning and applying vocabularies and methods of literary theory and criticism, performing close readings and analyses of primary texts and secondary source materials, developing a writerly voice and understanding conventions of literary criticism and research. Text: The Norton Anthology of King Lear; others will be posted online.

ENG 205-004 | TR 12:30–1:45
Introduction to Literary Studies
Mark Boren
MO 202
In this course we’ll refine our critical reading skills, sharpen our research, writing, and speaking skills, and learn major theoretical approaches to the study of written texts, including psychoanalysis, feminism, new historicism, deconstruction, and post-colonialism. Through the analysis of poetry, of fiction, and of non-fiction, and through the methodical study of critical essays on those primary texts, we’ll learn the intricacies involved in negotiating the world through language. Students will produce a variety of essays, including research essays.

ENG 205-005 | TR 2:00–3:15
Introduction to Literary Studies
Keith Newlin
MO 202
How does one find something interesting and informative to say about a work of literature? And how does one convey that interpretation effectively in writing? This course seeks to answer those two questions by introducing students to the methods of literary criticism and by providing an opportunity for detailed attention to the process of writing and revision. We will begin by examining a variety of interpretive strategies for reading literature; and then we will write a series of papers applying what we have learned to several literary works. Texts: The MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers, 8th ed.; Sophie Treadwell, Machinal; Horatio Alger, Ragged Dick.

ENG 210-001
ENG 210-002
ENG 210-003
Mythology
Ashley Bissette Sumerel
Online
In this course, students will become familiar with Greek, Roman, and Norse Mythology. In addition to critical analysis of the myths, students will learn different approaches to the study of mythology. They will also explore how mythological narratives affect our own culture and can inform our reading of literature.
This is a fully online course. Assignments may include weekly discussion board participation, writing activities, quizzes, essays, and a final exam.

ENG 211-001 | MWF 12:00–12:50
ENG 211-002 | MWF 1:00–1:50
British Literature to 1800
Mike Wentworth
MO 206
As a survey of English literature to 1800, our course will consider the enduring literary and cultural legacy of such major figures as Geoffrey Chaucer, Sir Thomas More, Christopher Marlowe, Ben Jonson, John Milton, Richard Steele, Joseph Addison, and Samuel Johnson and less familiar, though nonetheless significant, figures as Eliza Haywood, Frances Burney, Mary Astell, and Lady Mary Wortley Montagu (all of whom, you might note, are women) in relation to such topical and thematic concerns as power, freedom, social order, conformity and rebellion, life choices, happiness, the problem of evil, happiness, life choices, gender roles, romantic love, marriage, sexual commerce, and sexual exploitation. Over the upcoming weeks, we will encounter major barnyard mayhem, diabolical contracts gone bad, demonic delinquents on a tear, and, for better or worse, the full simmering broth of human emotion. Throughout the course, we will further consider strategies of interpretation, literary devices and conventions, and matters of literary form and genre.

ENG 212-001 | TR 9:30–10:45
English Literature Since 1800
Lewis Walker
TL 1010
This course is a survey of significant short works of English Literature from roughly the past 220 years. The three periods (Romantic, Victorian, and Twentieth Century and After) into which our book divides this work include poetry and prose of enormous diversity and richness. Types of literature covered include poems, short stories, and essays. In addition to analyzing the individual works read, we will give attention to the cultural and historical context of those works. Authors include William Wordsworth, John Keats, Virginia Woolf, Katherine Mansfield, James Joyce, T. S. Eliot., and Seamus Heany. Reading quizzes, two brief response papers, midterm and final exams. Text: The Norton Anthology of English Literature, Vol. 2. Ed. Carol T. Christ. Norton, 2012. 978-0-393-91248-7

ENG 223-001 | TR 9:30–10:45
American Literature to 1870
Lee Schweninger
MO 106
This course will offer you an overview of American literature from the era of European contact through the late Romantics in the nineteenth century. We will read this literature in its literary, political, historical, and social contexts. As such, we will look at literature of the European Explorers, at some American Indian responses to encounters with Europeans, at the colonial period including Puritan poets and historians, at the writings of some of the founding fathers and mothers, and at the Romantic era writers such as Poe, Irving, Hawthorne, Stowe, Dickinson, and Whitman, as well as Emerson and Throreau, lynchpins of the American literary renaissance, as it has been called. You will be asked to keep an informal reading response journal, to write formal short response essays, to be responsible for the readings and class discussions, to take occasional reading quizzes and mid-semester and a final essay exams. As this will be a discussion based class, attendance, participation, and attention to the readings will of course be required.
This course partially fulfills the University Studies writing intensive requirement.

ENG 224-001 | TR 9:30–10:45
American Literature Since 1870
Keith Newlin
MO 205
In this course we will read representative short fiction (and a novel), plays, and poems in American literature from the late 1900s to the present. We will discover how and why each story “works”—how it captures the reader’s interest, the aesthetic methods the authors use to tell their story. We will also look at the political, social, and cultural context; and we will discuss such issues as emerging feminism, critical responses to racism, the literature of propaganda, alienation and literary experiment, and why some writers get represented in anthologies and others do not. This section will also emphasize critical discussion and writing. Text: William Cain, ed., American Literature, Vol. 2, 2nd ed. (Penguin Academics).

ENG 227-300 | MWF 9:00–9:50
World Anglophone Literature: Caribbean Focus
Michelle L. Britt
MO 208
Anglophone is defined as: “An English-speaking person, especially one in a country where two or more languages are spoken.” This theme-based Literature course will examine various fiction and non-fiction pieces written in English from a range of Caribbean Islands. We will explore the cultural nuances associated with the works and their relationships to individual and collective identity. Students will study a variety of literatures and genres from the Caribbean region.

ENG 232-001 | TR 8:00–9:15
African American Literature: The Theory and Practice of Hip-Hop
Alex Porco
MO 205
In the 1970s, hip-hop emerged as a local cultural practice in the South Bronx, a neighborhood devastated by unemployment, drugs, and escalating gang violence, as well as the city's disinvestment in education. (As Howard Cosell famously announced during the telecast of the 1977 World Series, "The Bronx is Burning.") Today, hip-hop's a multi-million dollar industry with a truly global reach. Everything from haute couture fashion to professional sports and comic books are touched in some way by the music and culture. Our challenge is to think critically about the significant aesthetic, linguistic, economic, political, and technological contributions and transformations of hip-hop music and culture over the last thirty years. We will attend closely to hip-hop's four elements— rapping, turntablism, graffiti, and break dancing— as well as key figures, periods, and genres. Other topics we will address include: gangsta rap and moral panic in the late 1980s; the contributions of women to the production of hip-hop; the emergence of hip-hop cinema in the early 1980s; and the relationship between hip-hop music and progressive politics.

ENG 292-001
Netflix and Fill
Jeremy Tirrell
Online
Students in this online course will explore the cultural and aesthetic implications of binge media consumption by engaging episodic works in a variety of media through critical perspectives informed by relevant scholarly and popular texts. A Netflix subscription is required; other materials will be provided electronically.

ENG 294-001
International Study Course
Paula Kamenish
Time/Location TBD
This short-term study abroad course explores representative works of twentieth- and twenty-first-century Argentine writers, painters, and musicians. During 4 meetings at UNCW and the last 2 weeks of May in Buenos Aires, we will study the writings of authors such as Jorge Luis Borges, Julio Cortázar, and María Marta Marciano, the paintings of artists like Césareo Bernaldo de Quirós and Xul Solar, and the music of Argentine folk dance and tango. We will look at common themes in the arts and how these arts reveal the history of the people of Argentina and enrich the culture of its capital city.
Prerequisite: ENG 101. No foreign language skills required.
Students must apply through the Office of International Programs for the “Argentina faculty-led” travel program in order to take this course.

ENG 302-001 | MW 3:30–4:45
Journalism Workshop
Rory Laverty
BR 202
This Advanced Journalism Workshop will be focused on sportswriting. Over the course of the semester, we will cover UNCW and other local sports live; we will cover national and international sporting events and stories; we will interview athletes, coaches and administrators; we will write sports features, game stories, and op-eds; and finally, we will read and discuss some of the best sports journalism ever written, taken from online sources as well as David Halberstam’s The Best American Sports Writing of the Century.

ENG 303-001 | TR 12:30–1:45
Reading and Writing Arguments          
Don Bushman
MO 104
A course in critical reading and writing exploring such concepts as "argument," "persuasion," and "rhetoric." We will study readings from popular media which focus mainly on contemporary social and political issues, and we will critique these readings for the argumentative strategies the authors employ. Students will learn strategies for writing well-argued essays on topics of their own choosing. Required will be a portfolio of five polished essays (the last of which will require significant research).

ENG 304-001 | TR 9:30–10:45
Writing for Teachers
Victor Malo-Juvera
MO 206
This course will introduce theoretical foundations and instructional strategies for teaching writing in secondary schools. We will begin by examining skills such as vocabulary, grammar, brainstorming, prewriting, and basic paragraph structures. We will then address the most frequently encountered/tested writing in secondary schools: narrative, expository/informational, argumentative, and research papers. Techniques such as scaffolding instruction, peer editing/review, alternative forms of assessment, and culturally relevant instruction will play a critical role in this course. We will also examine requirements for on demand standardized writing assessment and discuss how the Common Core State Standards and the new trend in using End of Course tests may impact writing instruction in the future.

ENG 306-001 | TR 11:00–12:15
Essay Writing
Jennifer Kontny
MO 204
The essay is a vibrant and variant form of writing with a rich history. Together in English 306 we will read and analyze a variety of award-winning, contemporary essays. Line by line, paragraph by paragraph, our class will consider what writers do to help our pages come alive. After deconstructing the rhetorical techniques used by composers, we will engage in some experimentation of our own. Each student in the class will compose five exploratory essays. You will choose one of your exploratory pieces to revise into your final project and submit your draft for a class workshop. In addition to learning more about the essay form, students in the course will learn more about the revision process, and how writing can be shaped and reshaped to reach desired audiences.

ENG 310-001 | MW 11:00–11:50; F online
Theory and Practice of Editing (Hybrid)
Shirley Mathews
BR 160
Meets face-to-face on Mondays and Wednesdays; the other class meeting is online. Instruction in strengthening the backbone of writing with an emphasis on learning state-of-the-industry layout software. Course work includes extensive practice in the fundamentals of punctuation and grammar, editing, copyediting and rewriting, all done with an eye to preparing work for publication. Privacy and libel law are examined. Texts include: Media Writer's Handbook and The Associated Press Stylebook 2016.

ENG 312-001
Writing for Business
Lance Cummings
Online
In this completely online writing class, we will explore the various genres common throughout most business environments, including memos, letters, proposals, reports, and resumes. Additionally we will explore how to adapt these genres for online environments and improve your online presence. Since this class is completely online, we will be exploring how businesses create a professional presence online through social media, including an applied project where you will write a report for a local business. Consequently, you will be required to explore various Web 2.0 environments through collaborative, individual, and public work. This course is suitable for anyone interested in improving business writing skills and expanding career options during and after university life. By the end of the course, you will have several texts that you can use in professional portfolios and for self-promotion online. All students must have consistent access to an up-to-date personal computer and a robust high-speed internet connection.

ENG 317-001 | TR 2:00–3:15
Writing about Film
Nicholas Laudadio
MO 101
In this course, you will explore what it means to write about film from a critical and analytical perspective. We will begin the course with a review of writing mechanics and film terminology and then turn to a number of feature films that will serve as focal points for our attempts at academic and journalistic writing. While we will spend some time considering the movie review as a genre, we will concentrate most of our efforts on the critical/analytical essay. Although much of this class concerns itself with film studies and history, it is at heart (and in practice) a writing course, and therefore a writing intensive course. Information on readings will be available on Blackboard once the semester begins.

ENG 318-001 | TR 2:00–3:15
Writing and Activism
Diana Ashe
MO 204
This course considers the rhetorical power of a wide variety of forms of writing done in the name of social change. We will examine the genres most widely adopted for activist writing, the ways in which context influences and constrains writing, and the impact of motives and audiences upon activist writing. Our primary goal is to discern and analyze rhetorical principles and practices at work in activist writing. Texts include: Stewart, Charles J., Craig Allen Smith, and Robert E. Denton, Jr., Persuasion and Social Movements, 6th ed. Long Grove, Illinois: Waveland Press.

ENG 319-001 | MW 2:00–3:15
Document Design
Anthony Atkins
BR 202
This course will introduce students to the basics of document design including but not limited to fonts and font families, the use of multimedia in the creation and presentation of both print and online documents. Students will read theories of design as well as practice the development and design of online and print publication/s. There will be a focus on creating compelling user-centered artifacts and messages in electronic and physical contexts using theories of document design in visual rhetoric, visual literacy, visual culture, color theory, visual ethics, and design thinking. One project of the course, specifically, will be working with Adobe InDesign to complete a book project for the 2017 Azalea Festival.
Prior knowledge of specific technologies is not required but will be helpful. To prepare for the course, you might explore Adobe InDesign found in Adobe’s Creative Suite.

ENG 321-001 | W 3:30–6:15
Structure of the English Language
Dan Noland
MO 104
In this course you will become an expert in the metalanguage of the structures of English, beginning with those phonological and morphological, but most particularly the syntactic ones. You have been a master of most of those structures since early childhood; we need to concentrate on making this knowledge conscious, giving you the ability to describe what you know and making predictions based on that knowledge. In addition, some of the structures that we deal with may be new to you. This deeper understanding of your language should carry over into several related areas, and learning how to apply syntax to your own interests is one of your responsibilities. You need no special linguistic training to succeed. Text: Lobeck and Denham, Navigating English Grammar.
 
ENG 323-001 | TR 11:00–12:15
History of the English Language
Dan Noland
MO 104
This course, an introduction to the history of the English language, will focus primarily, though not exclusively, on the Old English period, the one most remote to us now, in order to gain a better understanding of the internal (sounds and structures) and external (social, political and military) manifestations of that history. Our first task is to acquire the abilities necessary to describe and discuss English. This class will demand a great deal of you in time, energy and intellectual curiosity. In return, you'll see English in a new light. This subject is my favorite and is surprisingly fun to study. Text: A Guide to Old English, Mitchell and Robinson, 8th ed.

ENG 325-001 | TR 12:30–1:45
Sociolinguistics
Jennifer Kontny
MO 206
How are the ways we talk to one another related to our gender, our race, and our social class? This course examines these questions from the perspective of modern sociolinguistic theory. By analyzing a wide range of languages and communities, we will learn about the various ways that language indexes identity throughout the world. To deepen our focus in the second half of the course, we will conduct individual research. By the end of the course each student will have composed a multimedia research project that reflects careful and sustained thinking in the area of sociolinguistics.

ENG 333-001 | TR 8:00–9:15
Shakespeare’s Later Plays
Lewis Walker
MO 206
This course will cover six plays selected from the second half of Shakespeare’s career, including representative comedies (Twelfth Night, Measure for Measure), tragedies (Hamlet, Macbeth), classical plays (Timon of Athens), and romances (The Tempest). Among other things, we will consider issues of genre, gender, historicity, and power. Reading quizzes, midterm and final exams, two short papers, oral presentation. Text: The Complete Works of Shakespeare (7th ed.), ed. David Bevington. New York: Pearson, 2014. 978-0-321-88651-4.

ENG 336-001 | TR 11:00–12:15
British Romanticism
Mark Boren
MO 206
Traditionally, Romantic subjectivity privileges the individual alone in Nature considering the transcendent or sublime, often based on a momentary, fleeting experience. This cultivation of a solitary, particularly masculine Romantic ego dominates the genre, and we’ll explore that, but we’ll also see how women, slaves, and soldiers exist in the English landscape and the imagination of its inhabitants as well. We’ll look at how Romantic writers living in England between 1780 and 1830 conceptualize and articulate what it means to be human in a beautiful if terrifying world. We’ll read a number of canonical and non-canonical texts, including experimental work by Wollstonecraft, Wordsworth, Byron, the Shelleys, Hemans, and Landon.

ENG 340-001 | MW 3:30–4:45
Multiculturalism and Literature
Meghan Sweeney
MO 106
This course will provide an introduction to contemporary perspectives on multiculturalism. Throughout the semester, we will be exploring graphic narratives from the U.S. and around the world (including John Lewis’s book about the Civil Rights Movement, March and Marjane Satrapi’s classic depiction of the Islamic revolution in Iran, Persepolis). We will consider how these narratives have, as Hilary Chute says, “the potential to be powerful precisely because they intervene against a culture of invisibility by taking the risk of representation.” This class will require thoughtful, engaged, and sustained reflection and an openness to the medium of comics.

ENG 342-001 | TR 12:30–1:45
Transnational Literatures: Surrealism, The Harlem Renaissance, and Black Mountain College
Alex Porco
MO 208
In 2010, Paul Jay published Global Matters: The Transnational Turn in Literary Studies. Jay’s book is devoted to examining “forms of cultural production”—notably literature—that travel across “real and imagined borders.” Or, put another way, he’s interested in “productive contact” between and across borders. The frisson of difference, let’s say. In his study The Social Life of Things, Arjun Appadurai states, “We have to follow the things [e.g., poems, paintings, movies, and musical recordings] themselves, for their meanings are inscribed in their forms, their uses, their trajectories… it is the things-in-motion that illuminate their human and social context.” Using Jay and Appadurai as starting points, this course will examine transnational literary and cultural productions through three particular nodes: [1] Surrealism; [2] The Harlem Renaissance; and [3] Black Mountain College. We will consider, for example, French Surrealism’s influence in Africa and the Caribbean: Andre Breton insisted, after all, on the “non-national boundaries of Surrealism.” Similarly, we will consider the Harlem–Paris nexus of the early 20th century. Finally, in studying Black Mountain College, students will examine how European emigres and refugees—many fleeing Hitler—transformed American culture by conducting radical experiments in art, music, and literature in the mountains of western North Carolina from 1933–1956.

ENG 352-001 | TR 12:30–1:45
American Modernism
Keith Newlin
MO 106
Roughly occurring between 1915 and 1940, American modernism signaled a time of literary experimentation as writers sought to respond to increased industrialism, the insights of psychoanalysis, social disruption brought on by immigration and migration from the American South to the North, and especially the sense of alienation caused by the onset of World War I. Quite simply, American writers' sense of the world underwent a metamorphosis—from the certainties of realism (where writers expressed a confidence in democracy and in plots that mirrored a world that seemed full of purpose) to a sense of dislocation (in which the world now seemed fragmentary and without apparent meaning). Writers such as Hemingway, Stein, Fitzgerald, Faulkner, Eliot, O'Neill, Pound, Williams, Hurston, and many others experimented with new subjects and especially with new methods of rendering experience in their fiction, poetry, and drama. This course introduces students to the chief writers and moments of what many see as the most influential period of American literature. Texts: The Norton Anthology of American Literature, 1914–1945, 9th ed., vol. D; Ernest Hemingway, In Our Time; Eugene O'Neill, The Hairy Ape; Elmer Rice, The Adding Machine; Langston Hughes, Mulatto.

ENG 356-001 | TR 2:00–3:15
American Indian Literatures
Lee Schweninger
MO 205
This course will offer you an in-depth look at several American Indian writers from the 20th and 21st centuries. We will look at a couple earlier writers such as William Apess (Pequot), Luther Standing Bear (Sioux), and Charles Eastman (Sioux) and at writers of the so-called American Indian Renaissance: Momaday (Kiowa), Welch (Blackfeet/Gros Ventre), Vizenor (Anishinaabe), and Erdrich (Anishinaabe). We will also read some of the younger, more recent writers such as Susan Power (Dakota), Sherman Alexie (Coeur d'Alene), Aaron Carr (Navajo), Sarah Vowell (Cherokee), and Toni Jensen (Métis). We will consider the very important historical and political contexts of the writings and also look at the other arts, especially American Indian painting of the same era. For this class, you will be asked to keep an informal reading response journal, to write formal short response essays, be responsible for the readings and class discussions, and to take occasional reading quizzes and mid-semester and a final essay exams. You will also be asked to lead class discussion at least once during the semester. As this will be a discussion-based class, your contributions are critical and thus attendance, participation, and attention to the readings will be required.
This course fulfills the departmental non-canonical requirement and the University Studies Living in a Diverse Nation requirement.

ENG 373-001 | W 3:30–615
Women’s Literary Traditions
Katie Peel
MO 206
As we prepare for spring semester, social media is abuzz with a #repealthe19th movement. A presidential candidate has boasted about sexually assaulting women. Transwomen of color are a disproportionately-targeted demographic for violence. Title IX issues are plaguing college campuses. “Women’s issues” have (finally?) been wrenched into the spotlight, and much of it has to do with the fact that one of the presidential candidates is a woman, and much of the spotlight has a hate-colored lens. How have women responded in a literary way to their conditions? How have they represented their experiences? How have they placed themselves into a literary history and canon that has often excluded them? How have they participated in, contributed to, and challenged narrative convention? How have they complicated our understanding of gender and womanhood? What might these authors have to offer to our understanding of our current conditions? Our course will explore these questions, covering narratives from Jane Sharp’s Midwives Book (1671) to Roxane Gay’s Black Panther series World of Wakanda (2016), and plenty in between.

ENG 375-001 | TR 9:30–10:45
American and British Poetry Since 1945: Sonnets
Alex Porco
MO 208
This course examines contemporary American and British poetry through the singular node of the sonnet. How and why do contemporary poets continually return to the sonnet? That’s the question we will try to answer. We will consider some of the more recent radical experiments with the sonnet form— from Ted Berrigan’s collage poems in The Sonnets to Adrienne Rich’s lesbian erotics in “Twenty-One Love Poems” and Ciaran Carson’s espionage novel-in-sonnets For All We Know. Particular emphasis will be placed on the sonnet sequence. To that end, a significant part of the semester will be devoted to reading John Berryman’s Dream Songs in its entirety. Along the way, students will become familiar with the devices of poetry, including meter, rhythm, rhyme, image, symbol, metaphor, voice, apostrophe, and tone, et cetera. Note: students will be expected to regularly recite poems from memory throughout the semester.

ENG 383-001 | TR 11:00–12:15
Classics Reconsidered
Victor Malo-Juvera
MO 208
This course will examine works of poetry, prose, and drama that are commonly taught in high school English classes. During our interrogation of texts, we will utilize various critical lenses to reveal traditional and alternative interpretations. We will question what constitutes a literary "classic," who labels classics as such, and how issues of race, gender, class, religion, and language influence what texts are included in and excluded from the "canon."

ENG 386-001 | MW 2:00–3:15
Critical Theory and Practice
Meghan Sweeney
MO 104
ENG 386 will introduce you to some of the major critical and theoretical texts that have influenced our perception of literary and cultural studies since the late nineteenth century. Throughout the semester, we will explore notions of difference, intertextuality, ideology, and more, as we read authors like Ferdinand de Saussure, Roland Barthes, and Michel Foucault. This is a challenging class, but it can be rewarding if you are willing to immerse yourself in the material. Active, engaged classroom participation is expected.

ENG 389-001 | TR 9:30–10:45            
Rhetorical Theory Since 1900
Don Bushman
MO 101
A course surveying the major rhetorical theorists of the past century within their historical moments. We’ll read both primary texts by those theorists and commentaries about them in order to better understand the relationship they espouse between discourse and the material world. We’ll consider rhetoric’s relationship to other fields of study as well as to the contemporary concerns of the day, such as politics, popular culture, science and technology, and so on. Required text: Golden, et al., The Rhetoric of Western Thought.

ENG 390-001 | MWF 9:00–9:50
Studies in Literature: The Beat Generation and American Culture
Mike Wentworth
MO 206
 “O man, I have to tell you NOW I have IT.” And you will, too, once you’ve got a ticket to ride far into the endless American night in the bad company of such notorious tour guides as Jack Kerouac, Neal Cassady, “Wild Bill” Borroughs, Allan Ginsberg, John Clellon Holmes, Gary Snyder, Lawrence Ferlinghetti, and other of their equally disaffected beat confederates. Spend some time with “the Holy Goof,” a veritable “Don Quixote of tenderness,” a demon of fantastic anarchy, the “cool man,” the “prelate of junk,” and “a real realist with a real tale to tell” and discover who gave away his last $2.27 on January 17, 1956 and to whom, who intends to retire to the Lake Isle of Manisfree before it’s too late, and what you’d serve Jack Kerouac for dinner. Or imagine you’re walking down the street on your way to clinch an important business deal when, anxious about the time, you check your watch only to find to your utter dismay that your Rolex has stopped. You notice a stranger, who just happens to be Neal Cassady, and you nervously ask him for the time. Find out what, exactly, Cassady’s response would be.

ENG 393-001 | MWF 10:00–10:50
Writing in the Scientific Disciplines
Kate Maddalena
MO 202
This course critically examines the current state of science writing in professional academic contexts and explores the multiple practical strategies scientists use to communicate in professional settings. The asks students to evaluate and propose best practices for texts in academic contexts such as peer-reviewed journals and professional conferences. Extra attention is paid to how writing and texts act rhetorically as tools of knowledge making rather than simple “products” of science. Students exit the course with a base of knowledge that will allow them to develop and strengthen their own professional science writing practices.

ENG 417-001 | MWF 12:00–12:50
Research Methods in Professional Writing
Kate Maddalena
MO 204
This course serves as preparation and practice for applied research projects in the field of professional writing. Students explore foundational and current literature in professional writing/technical communication with a particular focus on perspectives afforded by different methodologies. They then spend time experimenting with those perspectives by applying them to primary texts, ultimately designing a method or set of methods to answer their own research question(s). Students exit the course with an understanding of the methodological tools available to approach problems in professional writing/technical communication in both academic and professional contexts.

ENG 495-001 | TR 9:30–10:45
Senior Seminar in Literature: Literature of the Apocalypse
Mark Boren
MO 202
In this course we’ll study a wide range of apocalyptic literature, from medieval texts to holocaust work to The Walking Dead, from global devastation to personal, solitary destruction. Demarcating the genre and identifying and analyzing its various conventions, in this formal research seminar students are expected to rigorously and intellectually engage with the material studied, undertake independent research, and write substantial research papers. We’ll work towards an understanding, as a group of scholars, of the current resurgence of the genre and why at this particular moment in history it is once again rising, and just as importantly, why it is aesthetically rendered in the ways that it is. A note of warning: this course will at times deal with mature content, including descriptions of violence, sexuality, gore, despair, and hope—in short, human nature in its most extreme manifestations. We’ll look at work by Milton, Defoe, Yeats, Edwards, Byron, Shelley, Hopkins, Poe, Lovecraft, O’Brien, McCarthy, Kirkman, and others.

ENG 495-002 | TR 3:30–4:45
Senior Seminar in Literature: Critical Introduction to Science Fiction
Nicholas Laudadio
MO 202
In this course, we will explore one of the more misunderstood yet successful genres in literature and film studies. We will be considering science fiction as an historical, critical, and political force that attempts to better understand tomorrow today. Our readings will vary widely—from novel to short story to critical essay to philosophical treatise—and will also branch out into film and television and new media. You will be expected to read and research and explore aspects of this massive genre on your own and your final project will reflect a sustained engagement with the questions central to science fiction as a cultural/critical force.

ENG 496-01 | MW 3:30–4:45
Senior Seminar in Writing and Rhetoric: Writing on Cultures of Sustainability from a Global Perspective
Anirban Ray
MO 204
You will participate in an Experiencing Transformative Education through Applied Learning (ETEAL) and The Green Initiative grant-funded project with real-life applications of global environmental solutions to local problems. Divided into two parts, the first part focuses on theories of culture and globalization, while the second half deals with the case studies of specific cultural contexts.

Part I
How does culture reveals itself? What is the basis of American culture? How do we define and understand the East–West and North–South divide? What is more important, who we are or what we do? Is time defined in the past, the present, or the future? These and many such questions will provide basic lens for tackling the concept of intercultural communication. This course will serve as an introduction to the core concepts, theories, and practices of communication across the globe. You will be exposed to major readings focusing on the key paradigms of thinking in intercultural communications:

  • Cultural perceptions: ethnocentrism, racism, body politics, avowed versus ascribed identities
  • Cultural values, beliefs, communication styles
  • Forms and models of intercultural communication, cultural dimensions, contexting and value orientation models, and notions of ‘-scapes’
  • Language culture: importance and functions of NVC, kinesics, proxemics, and haptic

In addition to these core concepts, the course will also examine the relationship between cultural values and ecological practices in a global scale.

Part II
Building on the case studies, theories, and secondary research from across the globe, the course will investigate how cultural beliefs, rituals, and practices affect the ecosystem in general and the waterbodies in particular with a special focus on the Cape Fear River.
In this connection, you will study six major world rivers and several green campaigns and translate the ideas and concepts gathered from these studies to analyze the problems affecting the Cape Fear River. Through creative application of cultural and advocacy theories, you will identify how culture shapes the identity of a river and influences its treatment.
The high-impact course will challenge you to engage with real stakeholders from the local community, including organizations and students from local ISDs, participate in a fund-raising activity, contribute to the causes of community advocates, and share your expertise with others. You will analyze UN policies and learn about interesting but transferable cultural practices of sustainability.

CLA 210-001 | TR 12:30–1:45
Mythology
Lewis Walker
OS 2002
This course is an introduction to the mythology of ancient Greece and Rome, with some attention given to Mesopotamia and Northern Europe as time permits. Materials covered include modern theories of myth, the relationship of myth to history, myths of creation, views of the afterlife, and the part myth plays in narratives like those of the Trojan War and the city of Thebes. Reading quizzes, class participation, two short papers, midterm and final exams. Text: Morford, Mark P. O., et al., Classical Mythology. Oxford UP, 2014. 978-0-19-999732-9