Student resources

Getting library help is often your first step in any writing assignment. This set of links will help you get started.

Writing Center

This free, one-on-one tutoring center will help you focus and revise your compositions. Here are some resources.

Writing Center

This free, one-on-one tutoring center will help you focus and revise your compositions. Here are some online handouts to get you started.

Hours

Click on the link to bring up the current Writing Center hours.

navigating the center

Don't know how to schedule an appointment? Confused as to what you should bring to your Writing Center consultation? Everything is answered here.

How to study

If deadlines make you tear out your hair, here is a nice place to start. Check out the study guides, sample timetables, handouts and links at this Writing Center page.


 
   
   
Cristina Garcia, bestselling author and National Book Award finalist, reads from her latest novel, The Lady Matador's Hotel, as part of the Buckner Lecture series in March 2012. UNCW Photo by Katherine Freshwater

Undergraduate Course Descriptions

SPRING 2014

202-001                       MWF 8:00-8:50
201-002                       MWF 9:00-9:50
Introduction to Journalism
Jeff Neely
MO 204
This course will teach you about the craft of journalism and what it’s like to be a journalist. It is a very hands-on course. You will work outside of the classroom, on campus and in your community, to learn new things, speak to new people and develop compelling news stories. While the course is rooted in print journalism, you will also learn the basic multimedia skills required of a 21st-century journalist. In addition, you’ll learn the importance of deadlines, accuracy, newswriting style and ethical practice.

202-003
Introduction to Journalism
Kimberly Hemingway
MWF 10:00-10:50
MO 202
This class is an introduction to the world and skills of a working journalist. Through discussion, and more importantly, lots of practice, you will develop the tools that you will need to identify, gather, and report the news. While many of the practices you will learn in this course were developed by reporters working for large urban newspapers, you will apply these same core principles and practices (lede writing, story structure, how to cover news events, and conducting interviews) to reporting for any kind of outlet: print, broadcast, or the internet. We will also examine the differences between news stories and feature stories, and cover the basics of journalism ethics.

204-001                       MWF 10:00-10:50
204-002                       MWF 1:00-1:50
Introduction to Professional Writing
Sarah Hallenbeck
MO 204
Students in this course will explore the rhetorical, ethical, and design considerations that inform effective professional and technical communication. Working in both print and online contexts, they will develop strategies for conducting workplace research, performing audience analysis, and evaluating document usability. Students will produce a range of documents, including memos, proposals, instructions, and public relations materials. Much of their work will be conducted in a service-learning context in which their efforts will engage a wider context beyond the classroom. Text: Gurak and Lannon, Strategies for Technical Communication in the Workplace.

204-003
Introduction to Professional Writing
Anirban Ray
MW 3:30-4:45
MO 204
This course prepares you to face workplace challenges that require professional communication skills in terms of writing and presentation. It will enable you to develop critical appreciation for core technical concepts including audience, context, persuasion, and purpose in writing situations with an emphasis on ethics in communication. You will be exposed to writing a variety of business collaterals, such as resumes, memos, proposals and reports in different contexts and for different purposes.  Additionally, this course puts a huge emphasis on information design from a visual communication framework and challenges students to create technical documents from a defined visual perspective. Most importantly, you will find opportunities to collaborate with peers to share expertise, knowledge, and experience in a service-learning framework. By the end of this course, you will learn to design effective technical documents to solve problems with attention to text, visuals, format, usability, and citation. Text: Johnson-Sheehan, Technical Communication Today. 4th ed

204-004
Introduction to Professional Writing
Amanda Cosgrove
TR 8:00-9:15
MO 204
Introduction to Professional Writing is an introductory survey of concepts in professional writing, including audience analysis, research methods, visual thinking, and the composing process. This course includes a service-learning component.

204-005
Introduction to Professional Writing
Michelle Manning
TR 12:30-1:45
MO 204
This gateway course exposes students to the conventions of business documents, basic design principles, and effective job search documents. Through a series of individual and group assignments, activities and exercises, they will not only learn the basics of professional writing, but they will also engage in a collaborative service-learning project that will allow them to create documents and texts for clients. The semester-long project provides students with the opportunity to build an impressive set of portfolio artifacts that will trace their project from conception to completion. Students in this course will participate in the English in Action Showcase held at the end of the semester.

205-002
Introduction to Literary Studies
Marlon Moore
MW 2:00-3:15
MO 202
This course is designed to introduce students to literary criticism as a form of writing, and to develop their research, analytical, and interpretive skills by exposing them to the key questions and basic assumptions of various theoretical perspectives. We will do this by spending the first portion of the term focused on Toni Morrison’s novel, Song of Solomon; generating meaning through close readings and the development of a reader-response essay first; and then studying an array of critical responses to it in Toni Morrison’s Song of Solomon: A Casebook. We will then read John Updike’s Rabbit, Run and students will select a theoretical approach, such as feminism, New Criticism, Marxism, psychoanalysis, or queer theory, and write a research-based comparative essay about the conversation taking place about the novel in scholarly journals dedicated to that particular paradigm or in a collection of critical essays about the author. Other required texts: Lois Tyson: Using Critical Theory and the MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers, 7th ed.

205-003
Introduction to Literary Studies
Barbara Waxman
TR 9:30-10:45
MO 202
The text, the reader, the author, the social and historical context: these elements--in a variety of combinations--create interpretations of literature. This course shows you how to interpret literature, how to read deeply and widely, and also it considers why all readings are misreadings. Together we explore some methods of literary criticism which enable you to develop sophisticated essays about literature. We apply these methods to fiction, poetry, and drama. Our class also looks into some strategies of literary research, guided by an expert librarian in Randall Library. Warm-up writing exercises, brainstorming for essay topics, a conference with the instructor, workshops and peer-editing sessions will help you with your writing.

Our community of readers and writers will examine:  poems by Mary Oliver; a short play by Terrence McNally, “Andre’s Mother”; a novel by Ann Hood, The Red Thread; Oscar Wilde’s The Picture of Dorian Gray; and Peter Shaffer’s prize-winning play, Equus. The MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers will also be required, as will Steven Lynn’s Text and Context: Writing about Literature with Critical Theory. 

205-004
Introduction to Literary Studies
Keith Newlin
TR 11:00-12:15
MO 102
How does one find something interesting and informative to say about a work of literature? And how does one convey that interpretation effectively in writing? This course seeks to answer those two questions by introducing students to the theories and methods of literary criticism and by providing an opportunity for detailed attention to the process of writing and revision. We will begin by examining a variety of interpretive strategies for reading literature; and then we will write a series of papers applying what we have learned to several literary works. Texts include: Gibaldi, The MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers, 7th ed.; Lynn, Texts and Contexts, 6th ed.; Treadwell, Machinal; Alger, Ragged Dick.

205-005
Introduction to Literary Studies
Lee Schweninger
R 12:30-1:45
MO 207
This course is an introduction to literary studies and will thus offer you the opportunity to develop your knowledge of how to read, interpret and write about literature. The course has four primary objectives: (1) to introduce you to the field of English studies, including discussions of what you can do with an English degree; (2) to provide you with instruction on how to do research and how to write as a literary scholar; (3) to expose you to general overviews of some prominent approaches to the study of literature; and (4) to enable you to critically examine your own approaches to literature through engagement with primary literary texts.

Because this is a writing intensive course, you will be asked to write and submit several formal response essays, argumentative research essays, and to keep an informal reading response journal. You will also be responsible for the readings and class discussions and to take occasional reading quizzes. As this will be a discussion based class, attendance, participation, and attention to the readings will of course be required.

This course partially fulfills the University Studies writing intensive and the information literacy requirements.

205-005
Introduction to Literary Studies
Tiffany Gilbert
MW 3:30-4:45
MO 207
Having patiently copied every word in the prison library’s dictionary and read every book in the library’s collections, Malcolm X realized, “I had never been so truly free in my life. . . . [A] new world opened to me, of being able to read and understand.”  Indeed, literature is more than words scratched on a page; it is and can be a source of personal, political, social, and cultural liberation.  In this course, we will study a mixture of genres and narratives with an eye toward shaping our responses to a particular text and constructing meaning in a collaborative setting.  Assignments may include informal in-class writings, several critical essays, and individual and group presentations. 

209-001
Classical Literature in Translation
Lewis Walter
TR 9:30-10:45
MO 207
The classical writings of ancient Greece and Rome are still very much alive in the multiple ways they have influenced our culture. We will sample a rich variety of texts that still speak to us today, including Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey (courage, heroism, living by one’s wits, wandering and returning home); tragedy by Aeschylus (Agamemnon [religious devotion vs. family loyalty, adultery, revenge]); philosophy by Plato (Apology of Socrates [devotion to personal principles vs. duty to the nation or state]); lyric poetry by Catullus (celebration of and cynicism about forbidden heterosexual love) and Sappho (lesbian love); Virgil’s epic The Aeneid (duty to the gods vs. passionate personal love); Ovid’s Metamorphoses (memorable accounts of the transformations of form that take place in classical myths). We will also give some attention to the influence of classical works on later literature and on our culture today. Reading quizzes, class participation, written responses, midterm and final exams.  Text: The Norton Anthology of Western Literature. 8th ed. Vol. 1.

210-800
210-810
Mythology
Ashley Bissette-Sumerel
Online
In this course, students will become familiar with Greek, Roman, and Norse Mythology, as well myths from many other cultures. We’ll explore several types of myths, such as Creation Myths, Trickster Myths, and the Female Divine. In addition to critical analysis of the myths, students will explore how they affect our own culture and can inform our reading of literature.

This is a fully online course. Assignments include weekly discussion boardparticipation, short writing activities, quizzes, essays, and exams.

211-001                       TR 11:00-12:15
211-002                       TR 12:30-1:45
British Literature to 1800
Michael Wentworth
MO 104
As a survey of British literature from Beowulf (first recited in the eighth century) to the death of Samuel Johnson (1784), the course will consider such major authors as Geoffrey Chaucer, Christopher Marlowe, Ben Jonson, John Milton, Jonathan Swift, and Samuel Johnson; a broad variety of genres, including narrative poetry, utopian fiction, tragedy, comedy, Christian epic, travel narrative, biography, and the periodical essay; topical and thematic concerns such as wit, imagination, art and nature, reason and passion, life choices, happiness, gender roles, and crime and punishment; such concerns as the value and purpose of literature, strategies of interpretation, and various factors that figure into the enduring permanence of our featured writers; and the relevance of selected works to other works of literature students have read, the current arena of local, national and international affairs, contemporary popular culture, and other academic courses students have taken.  Required text: The Norton Anthology of English Literature, Vol. 1.

212-001
British Literature since 1800
Katherine Montwieler
MWF 11:00-11:50
MO 201
Industrialization transformed the English countryside in the nineteenth century: cities sprang up in former villages, railroads traversed the nation, and factories spewed smoke over pastures.  Industrialism’s effects on individuals were just as momentous: nature junkies searched for nostalgic retreats, masses of poor children worked in mines, and thousands of people died of disease due to unsanitary living spaces.  In the twentieth century, Great Britain faced two unprecedented world wars and the loss of her empire.  Throughout both centuries, writers used bodily metaphors to explore social and political issues the nation faced.  In this class we’ll focus on how the British body changed in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries as the nation coped with industrialism, imperialism, and its gain and loss of global power. 

212-002
British Literature since 1800
Alex Porco
MWF 12:00-12:50
MO 210
This course is a survey of British literature from the Romantic period through to the early twenty-first century. By the course’s end, students will be familiar with major authors such as Wordsworth, Keats, Smith, De Quincey, Browning, Rossetti, Yeats, Eliot, Ford, Mansfield, Beckett, Greene, and Smith. We will engage with canonical and non-canonical works in a wide variety of modes, genres, and media, including lyric, dramatic, and narrative poetry; autobiography, the novel, and the essay; and cinema, television, and popular music. Throughout the semester, we will make a point of considering how aesthetic value, literary form, representational strategies, and language practices develop in dynamic relation to historical, political, and material contexts of production and reception— for example, the Industrial Revolution and city life, nationalism and colonialism, shifting gender roles, the emergence of “popular culture,” World Wars I and II, the decline of the British Empire, postmodernism, and globalism.

Readings may include selections from The Norton Anthology of British Literature –vol. 2; Thomas De Quincey, Confessions of an English Opium Eater; George Meredith, Modern Love; Alan Moore, The League of Extraordinary Gentleman, vol. 1; Ford Madox Ford, The Good Soldier; Graham Greene, The Quiet American; recordings by The Sex Pistols, The Clash, Joy Division, The Smiths, Pulp, Oasis, and Massive Attack; Zadie Smith, White Teeth; Alice Oswald, Memorial; and BBC America’s Orphan Black. Attendance and participation are essential to success in the course.

223-001
American Literature to 1870
Christopher Gould
TR 12:30-1:45
MO 106
The course surveys major authors in fiction, nonfiction, and poetry from the colonial period to 1870. Every student keeps a reading journal and writes two analytical essays, each of which comprises 20% of the semester grade.  Final exam and a series of reading quizzes each account for 20%.  Text:  McQuade, Donald, et al.  The Harper Single Volume American Literature. Vol 1. 2nd ed.

224-003                       TR 9:30-10:45
224-004                       TR 8:00-9:15
American Literature since 1870
Christopher Gould
MO 104
The course surveys major authors in fiction, poetry, and drama from 1865 to the present. Every student keeps a reading journal and writes two critical essays, each of which comprises. 25% of the semester grade.  The average of reading-quiz scores accounts for the remaining 25%.  Text:  McQuade, Donald, et al.  The Harper American Literature.  3rd ed.

224-005
American Literature since 1870
Keith Newlin
TR 2:00-3:15
MO 101
In this course we will read representative short fiction, plays, and poems in American literature from the late 1900s to the present. We will discover how and why each story “works”—how it captures the reader’s interest, the aesthetic methods the authors use to tell their story. We will also look at the political, social, and cultural context; and we will discuss such issues as emerging feminism, critical responses to racism, the literature of propaganda, alienation and literary experiment, and why some writers get represented in anthologies and others do not. This section will also emphasize critical discussion and writing.  Texts include: Cain, American Literature, vol. 2, 2nd ed.; Faulkner, As I Lay Dying.

225-001
World Literature to 1600
Lewis Walker
TR 12:30-1:45
MO 205
We will range widely in time and geographical location to encounter a representative sampling of the rich variety in world literature during a period of over 4000 years. Readings will include the Gilgamesh epic; selections from ancient Egyptian poetry and the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament); selections from Homer’s Iliad (another epic); the Medea of Euripides (a tragedy); selections from Plato and Aristotle (philosophy); selections from ancient Chinese literature (The Classic of Poetry and the Analects of Confucius); selections from ancient India (the Bhagavad-Gita); selections from Roman poetry (Catullus, Virgil, and Ovid); selections from the Christian Bible (New Testament); selections from Islam’s Golden Age (Koran and The Thousand and One Nights); selections from the Italian Renaissance (Machiavelli). Reading quizzes; class participation; written responses, midterm and final exams.   Text: The Norton Anthology of World Literature. Shorter 3rd ed. Vol. 1.

227-001
World Anglophone Literature (Caribbean Focus)
Michelle Britt
MWF 11:00-11:50
MO 210
Anglophone is defined as: “An English-speaking person, especially one in a country where two or more languages are spoken.”   This theme based Literature course will examine various fiction and non-fiction pieces written in English from a variety of Caribbean Islands.  We will explore the cultural nuances associated with the works and their relationships to individual and collective identity.

230-002
Women in Literature
Meghan Sweeney
MW 3:30-4:45
MO 201
In this class we will begin to deconstruct some of the common myths of womanhood, and in particular those associated with work and labor. How has the notion of “women’s work” changed throughout the 20th century? How do race and class intersect with gender to create different expectations about and experiences of work? Together, we’ll read stories, essays, and poems written by women in order to begin answering these and other questions.

You’ll need to be intellectually rigorous, historically aware, and willing to challenge yourself. Be prepared to read and write critically and take part in vigorous class discussions. Texts: an anthology (including Susan Glaspell, Virginia Woolf, Tillie Olsen, Barbara Ehrenreich, and many others).

232-002
African American Literature
Marlon Moore
TR 2:00-3:15
MO 205
Through the theme “Flight Patterns,” this course examines depictions of movement, migration and escape in modern African American fiction. We will consider the role of such depictions as storytelling devices, as well as the ways they illuminate notions of family, sexuality, racial and regional identities, and class status. Students will produce brief response essays throughout the semester and write one major comparative analysis. Required texts: Toni Morrison, Song of Solomon; Sherley A. Williams, Dessa Rose; Ann Petry, The Street; Octavia Butler, Parable of the Sower; and Katherine Acheson, Writing Essays About Literature.

290-002
Themes in Literature:  Literature in Motion
Michelle Britt
MWF 9:00-9:50
Various Locations
This atypical course would explore Literature beyond the classroom.  You will make connections, analyze, and draw conclusions between place/setting and how it affects not just the assigned reading but the surrounding community (UNCW & Wilmington).  You will critically think, analyze perspectives, and experience relevancy in this multi genre literary course.  A variety of poems, plays, shorts stories, and essays from the anthology Literature to Go will be assigned throughout the semester.  Each class meeting will be held at a different outside setting on campus.  Some will take place at off campus locations.  *Please note: classes will be held, rain or shine, hot or cold (severe weather excluded).  

290-004
Themes in Literature:  Science Fiction
John Clifford
TR 9:30-10:45
MO 106
Through a variety of stories, novels, and films, we will explore popular themes in Science fiction, including Alien Encounters, Artificial Life, Time, Dystopias and Apocalypses. We will read classic writers: Bradbury, Le Guin, Asimov, Dick, Heinlein as well as such recent masters as Octavia Butler and Cormac McCarthy. Two short papers and two exams.

290-005
Themes in Literature:  Food, Identity and Nurturance
Barbara Waxman
TR 11:00-12:15
MO 101
Narratives of family life and growing up, depictions of nurturing relationships across the generations, inventions of new kinds of families, the centrality of food as a metaphor and a symbol, explorations of religious and cultural beliefs and myths connected to food: these are characteristics of the culinary memoirs, the novel about food, and the food essays that we will examine together. You will also get a deeper appreciation of these books by interviewing a family member about a family recipe and writing a short piece about this recipe, by doing an analysis of one of the texts on our syllabus, enriched through research on the culture depicted in the text, and by penning a short version of your own food memoir. Texts include: Pepin, The Apprentice: My Life in the Kitchen; Reichl, Tender at the Bone; Von Bremzen, Mastering the Art of Soviet Cooking: a Memoir of Food and Longing; Samuelsson, Yes, Chef: A Memoir; Mones, The Last Chinese Chef: A Novel; Abu-Jaber, The Language of Baklava. We’ll also look at some short essays on food by Ann Hood and others. We may even sample some of the recipes in our readings!

294-001
International Studies Abroad:  Buenos Aires:  Capital of Culture
Paula Kamenish
15-29 May 2014
For the 3rd year, UNCW students will study the culture of Buenos Aires through its writers, painters, and musicians. The course begins in April with map exercises to discover the neighborhoods of the city, PPT introductions to Argentine painting, literature, and music, and a mini-class on useful Argentine expressions. The travel begins mid-May and highlights writers such as Borges, painters such as Xul Solar, and the music of Argentine folk dance and tango. Activities include participation in an acclaimed writer’s class about Borges’ life and stories, a café meeting with a political journalist and biographer of Che Guevara, national art museums, live musical events, the San Telmo market, and historic sites. Housing is in an upscale apartment hotel in Recoleta, the best neighborhood for study, shopping, and exploration. The 2-week course earns 2 University Studies credits and is designed for any major. No previous knowledge of Spanish is needed.

294-003
International Studies Abroad:  Narrative of Oppression and Resistance
Katie Peel
13-27 May 2014
This course explores the literature and geography of oppression and resistance through narratives of the Holocaust and the Iron Curtain. We will study how the narratives and sites of oppression and resistance reveal both the worst and best of human potential.

At the core of this class, we will consider issues of representation, voice, and genre, as well as study current events and controversies regarding Holocaust and Cold War history and narrative. We will seek to make connections to other literatures of marginalized groups, studies of oppressed peoples, human rights concerns, discussions of individual and communal responsibilities, and significant ethical questions from both the twentieth century and today. Though people of various identities were targeted by the Nazis, our course will focus on the experiences of Jews, women, gays and lesbians, and Roma/Sinti (commonly known as gypsies). We will study various means of resistance enacted by oppressed peoples and on their behalves, both during the Holocaust, and afterwards, during the Soviet occupation of Eastern Europe. The travel component will strive to make the literature tangible for students, a goal which is especially important when considering oppression, genocide, and denials thereof. We will be able to investigate firsthand the roles of memorialization in public memory and narrative. The travel component in May will consist of a trip to Munich, Berlin, and Krakow.

301-001
International Journalism
Shirley Mathews
MWF 12:00-12:50
MO 202
Now with a Backpack Journalism module that will give students the basic skills to be a one-person field reporter, filing stories and other multimedia from the devices you may already be carrying in your pocket. In this class, point of view is everything, and nowhere is it more urgent for journalists to understand cultural, political and social differences than in the international arena. This course will introduce students to the basics of international reporting, emphasizing how the ebb and flow of information is influenced by countries, political interests and the media itself. In addition to the theoretical, this course will stress the practical and hands-on aspect, and students will write stories, work on videos and explore social media, with an eye to discovering the interconnectedness of world media. Strongly suggested: An iPhone or other device capable of taking photos and transmitting text across the Internet.

302-001
Journalism Workshop
Rory Laverty
TR 12:301:45
BR 160
Learn the fine points of beat reporting, investigative and feature writing, op/eds, and 'new journalism' while reading old and new classics of journalism online. Emphasis is on reporting for newspapers and online, but we will consider magazine writing, multimedia and broadcast along the way. Pre-requisite is ENG 202 or consent of the instructor.

303-001
Reading and Writing Arguments
Don Bushman
MWF 9:00-9:50
MO 202
A course in critical reading and writing exploring such concepts as "argument," "persuasion," and "rhetoric." We will study readings from popular periodicals which focus mainly on contemporary social and political issues, and we will critique these readings for the argumentative strategies the authors make use of. Students will learn to write well-argued essays on topics of their own choosing. Required will be a portfolio of four polished essays (the last of which will require significant research) and an oral report.

304-001                       MWF 1:00-1:50                     MO 209
304-002                       MWF 12:00-12:50                 MO 201
Writing for Teachers
Victor Malo
This course will introduce theoretical foundations and instructional strategies for teaching writing in secondary schools.  We will begin by examining skills such as vocabulary, grammar, brainstorming, prewriting, and basic paragraph structures.  We will then address the most frequently encountered/tested writing in secondary schools: narrative, expository/informational, argumentative, and research papers.  Techniques such as scaffolding instruction, peer editing/review, alternative forms of assessment, and culturally relevant instruction will play a critical role in this course.  We will also examine requirements for on demand standardized writing assessment and discuss how the Common Core State Standards and the new trend in using End of Course tests may impact writing instruction in the future. 

306-002
Essay Writing
Hannah Abrams
TR 2:00-3:15
MO 104
“A good essay must have this permanent quality about it; it must draw its curtain round us, but it must be a curtain that shuts us in not out,” says Virginia Woolf.

Students in this course will explore the compelling form of the familiar essay. Reading may include selections from The Art of the Personal Essay, Best American Essays, The Seneca Review, and The Artful Edit. Expect writers to range from George Orwell to David Sedaris, subject matter to move from the death of a moth to a man that works as a Macy’s Christmas elf, and style to stretch from the polemic to the braided lyric.

Dynamic discussions of the texts will not only generate a shared critical lexicon, but shape readers into writers. Workshops and drafting will evolve students into editors. And, in the end, through research and a variety of exercises on form, students will produce their own portfolio of powerful personal essays.

“You are going after wisdom,” Phillip Lopate reminds us.

306-003
Essay Writing
Paula Kamenish
Online
In this online course you will read a selection of essays on various topics by Chesterton, Morley, Twain, Cohen, Dershowitz, and others in order to analyze what makes successful writing. You will respond to classmates' writing and produce four formal essays, taking each through a series of drafts. One essay will be a personal narrative; another will ask you to be philosophical and meditative as you “try on” ideas. Your final essays will ask you to be subtly persuasive and digitally creative. It is important that all of your writing be clear, original, and true to your voice.

This course will be conducted online with assignments and materials grouped into Weekly Units. It is important that you follow the sequence and meet your deadlines. Students must have reliable access to a computer and must be adept at using all aspects of Blackboard, PowerPoint, and email. Find out if eLearning is for you: http://www.uncw.edu/OEL/studentstart.html

309-001
Technical Editing
Colleen Reilly
TR 9:30-10:45
MO 204
Students in this course learn to identify how to improve documents and clearly express their plans for revisions orally and in writing. Along the way, they will acquire an interest in and appreciation for the conventions of English grammar, punctuation, and usage. Students work on the fundamentals of writing in order to develop the language and analytical skills necessary to edit technical documents, which include the forms, manuals, policy handbooks, websites, and other texts used in business, academic, and nonprofit organizations, and to argue successfully for the changes they make or recommend. Projects prompt students to edit documents at all levels, addressing a text’s sentence-level issues as well as its overall structure and visual design.

310-001
Theory and Practice of Editing
Shirley Mathews
MWF 10:00-10:50
BR 160
Instruction in strengthening the backbone of writing. Course work includes extensive practice in the fundamentals of punctuation and grammar, editing, copyediting and rewriting, all done with an eye to preparing work for publication. Privacy and libel law are examined. Texts include: Creative Editing; Media Writer's Handbook, and The Associated Press Stylebook.

311-001
Professional Magazine Writing
Shirley Mathews
MWF 11:00-11:50
BR 160
Nothing tells the whole story the way a magazine piece does, and, in this course, students will have hands-on experience in this long-form style: developing story ideas, interviewing sources, reporting far-ranging topics, shaping their writing and creating a point of view. They will also explore various types of multimedia that will support and make their stories more marketable. This course is designed to take a student to the next level of writing and reporting, where the superficial is peeled back, and the deeper reporting begins. No formal textbook is required.

312-001                       TR 8:00-9:15
312-002                       TR 9:30-10:45
Writing for Business
Michelle Manning
BR 160
Professional writing is not just about crossing all our T's and dotting all our I's properly. Writing on the job requires knowing the types of documents that are familiar to our bosses and coworkers, so they can find information quickly. Each of these documents has certain conventions and requirements we need to master to communicate effectively - and efficiently - in the workplace. In this course, we will focus on analyzing and producing rhetorically effective workplace writing with an eye on audience awareness, using different genres, and developing a professional tone throughout. Students will work individually and collaboratively on projects including memos, letters, proposals and reports. The course is suitable for students of any major who want to improve their professional writing skills and thus their career potential. By the course’s end, students will produce writing artifacts suitable for inclusion in their professional portfolios and will participate in the English in Action Showcase held at the end of the semester.

313-001
Writing about Science
Colleen Reilly
TR 11:00-12:15
MO 204
Students in this course learn to write about science and technology primarily for non-scientific audiences. Through course projects, students analyze scientific texts and compose articles based on scientific and technical information. Students are encouraged to center course projects on the areas of science of most interest to them, such as marine biology, chemistry, environmental sciences, psychology, medicine, and technology. The course also teaches research skills useful for writing in and about all areas of science. Readings include articles by successful science writers as well as information about the profession of science writing, including the specific techniques, responsibilities, and challenges related to effectively and ethically writing about science.

314-001                       MWF 11:00-11:50
314-002                       MWF 12:00-12:50
Writing and Technology
Anirban Ray
MO 204
In this course we will call upon our fundamental assumptions on writing and technology and how one influences the other in a “cumulative feedback loop.” As personal computers, the Internet, and Web 2.0 have occupied an important position in the spheres of human communication and guided interactions, their roles in meeting our everyday communication practice cannot go unchallenged. Through working with various instantiations of technologies, we will critically explore the intersections of writing and technology and how they inform our daily production and consumption of information.  Evolution of writing, the breakout of the visual, the interface culture, and techniques of text production are some of the concepts we will discuss and tackle in this course.  A vital component of this course is learning and applying open source software in multimodal projects for both individual and collaborative ventures.  Toward this end, we will explore through discussions and debate the merits of adopting and appropriating open source application in our daily communication practices. By the end of this course, you will learn to make critical choices about adopting, assessing, and using the Internet and computer technologies for everyday communication situations.

315-001
Topic in Writing and Rhetoric: News Revolution
Jeff Neely
MWF 11:00-11:50
MO 202
This course looks at journalism past and present. We will begin by looking at the role of journalism throughout human history, from preliterate societies to the precolonial age, from the American Revolution to the digital revolution. We will then consider the challenges and opportunities facing journalism in the era of digital media. How do news consumers evaluate credibility with news coming from so many different of sources? What does “storytelling” mean in a multimedia world? What will news look like in the future?

315-003
Topic in Writing and Rhetoric:  Sports Writing
Rory Laverty
TR 2:00-3:15
BR 160
Sports Journalism Pre-requisite ENG 202 This sportswriting course will involve significant reporting from the fields, courts, and bleachers. We will read selections from David Halberstam's The Best American Sportswriting of the Century, and we will consume today's sportswriting in all its forms, mostly online. Major assignment sections include The Game Story, The Beat, The Feature, The Column, Multimedia/Broadcast, and New Journalism. Pre-requisite ENG 202 or permission of the Instructor.

316-001
Analyzing Style
Dan Noland
W 3:30-6:15
MO 205
This course focuses on analytical writing about other writers' styles, in order to be able to speak with specificity about what makes an effective prose style. We will begin by addressing grammatical and stylistic principles and concepts and applying them in shorter writings, readings and discussions. We will then move to looking in detail at various authors, both contemporary and historical. Grades assigned from class discussion, analyses and a final project. Texts include: Corbett and Connors, Style and Statement; Hale and Gordon, Sin and Syntax.

317-001                       TR 9:30-10:45        MO 102
317-002                       TR 2:00-3:15          MO 207
Writing about Film
Nicholas Laudadio
In this course we will begin with the basics of film language/terminology and then move through several different genres of filmwriting: reviews and contextual/critical essays. We will discuss the mechanics of and practice writing in most of these formats, but there will be a particular focus on the critical/analytical essay and film review. While much of this class concerns itself with film studies and history, it is at heart (and in practice) a writing course, and therefore a writing intensive course.

319-001
Document Design
Diana Ashe
MW 2:00-3:15
MO 204
The purpose of this course is to clarify the principles behind sound and effective design of print and electronic documents, and to put these principles into practice through intensive reading, practice, and discussion. We will deepen and broaden our understanding of the field through practice and through readings in the history and theory behind good design and visual rhetoric. In so doing, we will consider the particular challenges of print and electronic documents. Texts include Williams, The Non-Designer’s Design Handbook; Kimball and Hawkins, Document Design.

319-002
Document Design
Jeremy Tirrell
TR 3:30-4:45
MO 204
Students in this course will explore principles of document design through critical analysis and practical application. Students will generate multiple print and electronic documents, both independently and in groups, through iterative drafting and revision cycles that incorporate usability feedback. Course readings will examine professional design theory and practice. Texts include: Kimball and Hawkins, Document Design: A Guide for Technical Communicators; Lupton, D.I.Y.: Design It Yourself.

320-001                       TR 8:00-9:15
320-002                       TR 9:30-10:45
Introduction to Linguistics
Dan Noland
MO 205
Language is a primary way we indicate aspects of our social identity. Beyond the semantic content of our utterances, speech communicates who we are, where we come from, and what social experience we have had. In this introductory course on linguistics, we study this relationship between language and social identity through a variety of key topics in sociolinguistics: language variation; style and performance; language attitudes and ideologies; language choice in multilingual speech communities; regional and ethnic dialects; language, gender, and sexuality. We ask questions such as why do people speak differently in different social contexts, what are the diverse ways speakers use language to signal aspects of their social identity, and what does language reveal about social relationships within a community?

321-001
Structure of English Language
Dan Noland
TR 11:00-12:15
MO 205
In this course you will become an expert in themetalanguage of the structures of English, particularly the syntactic ones. You have been a master of most of those structures since early childhood; we need to concentrate on making this knowledge conscious, giving you the ability to describe what you know, and making predictions based on that knowledge. In addition, some of the structures that we deal with in here may be new to you. This deeper understanding of your language should carry over into several related areas, and learning how to apply syntax to your own interests is one of your responsibilities. You need no special linguistic training to succeed.

333-001
Shakespeare’s Later Plays
Lewis Walker
TR 8:00-9:15
MO 207
This course will cover seven plays selected from the second half of Shakespeare’s career, including representative comedies (Twelfth Night, Measure for Measure), tragedies (Hamlet, King Lear), classical plays (Antony and Cleopatra), and romances (The Tempest). Among other things, we will consider issues of genre, gender, historicity, and power. Reading quizzes, informal response papers, midterm and final exams, oral presentation, and critical paper of 2000 words.  Text: The Complete Works of Shakespeare. Ed. David Bevington. 7th ed.

336-001
British Romanticism
Katherine Montwieler
MWF 10:00-10:50
MO 201
Traditionally, Romantic subjectivity privileges the individual, able, male body walking alone in Nature considering a transcendent or sublime experience.  But the bodies of women, prisoners, slaves, and soldiers haunt the English landscape and the imagination of its inhabitants as well.  In this course, we’ll look at how Romantic writers living in England between 1780-1830 conceptualized human bodies to conceive of their position in the universe, their relation to others, and their place in history.  We’ll read a number of canonical and non-canonical texts, including work by Wollstonecraft, Wordsworth, Byron, the Shelleys, Hemans, and Landon.

358-001
African American Literature Post 1945
Marlon Moore
TR 12:30-1:45
MO 210
This course provides an advanced survey of literature by Americans from the African Diaspora. It covers a wide variety of works from major authors, and provides a model for approaching literature from a variety of literary and socio-cultural perspectives. Students will lead discussion on assigned dates, write weekly analytical response papers, research and present on a major cultural debate, and take a final exam. Text: Gates and Mckay (Eds), Norton Anthology of African American Literature 2nd Ed.

359-001
World Indigenous Literature and Film
Lee Schweninger
T 3:30-6:15
MO 210
This course offers a study of past and present literatures and film produced by various Indigenous peoples from outside the United States. Students will be expected to read the "source" material for several of the films being studied. In this sense, the course is a literature course in which we will consider theories of adaptation, diversity, and some film theory. The course – which meets once a week for 3 hours – will include screenings of several films. Attendance will, of course, be required, as will class participation. Students will be asked to keep a reading/viewing response journal, will write formal essays, and be responsible for occasional in class quizzes an exercises.

The course satisfies University Studies II: Approaches and Perspectives/Living in a Global Society, and it partially satisfies University Studies III: Thematic Transdisciplinary Cluster/Global Diversity.

361-001
Studies in Short Fiction
John Clifford
TR 11:00-12:15
MO 106
A discussion oriented class focused on an analysis of short fiction written since 1945. We begin with an anthology of classic American stories by such masters as Cheever, Ellison, Updike, Carver, Le Guin and Oates. In the second half we will read O’Brien’sThe Things They Carriedand the O’Henry Prize Stories from 2012. Two short papers and two exams.

362-001
Studies in the Novel:  The Best Seller
Keith Newlin
TR 9:30-10:45
MO 101
In this course we will read a number of best selling novels, ranging from novels about spies and government conspiracies to novels of social protest and satire to tales of love betrayed and manhood gained. All have one distinctive characteristic: each was among the top 10 selling novels of the year. We will seek to answer a number of questions about these novels, such as what is a best seller? How does a novel get to be a best seller? Is there a difference between highbrow and lowbrow fiction? If I like best selling novels, particularly ones not normally taught in college courses, is my literary taste somehow suspect? Why do some novels break sales records in one year and then disappear from our cultural memory?

Texts include: Mickey Spillane, I, The Jury (The Mike Hammer Collection, vol. 1); Cormac McCarthy, The Road; Jacqueline Susann, Valley of the Dolls; John Steinbeck, The Grapes of Wrath; Kurt Vonnegut, Breakfast of Champions; Stephen King, Firestarter; John Le Carré, The Spy Who Came in from the Cold; Hemingway, The Old Man and the Sea.

363-001
Studies in Nonfiction: Women in Journalism
Kimi Hemingway
TR 12:30-1:45
BR 281
This course will focus primarily on women and the news media. It aims to increase your media literacy about the historical role women have played – and continue to play – in journalism. We will explore how key strides made by women in newsrooms impacts newsroom diversity, and we will tackle issues still facing women journalists today, such as the glass ceiling and the mommy track. Additionally, we will investigate how news media treat women, and how that treatment influences public perceptions about women and women’s issues.

371-001
European Literature since 1900
Paula Kamenish
MWF 10:00-10:50
MO 104
Twentieth-century Europe--its history, its culture, and particularly its literature--provides indispensable lessons to us as American readers.  Many UNCW students are unfamiliar with the European continent’s most passionate and articulate reactions to war, holocaust, colonialism, and terrorism. Authors from Erich Maria Remarque to Lydia Chokovskaya explore these controversial themes with uncanny beauty and sensitivity. Our syllabus includes novellas, short stories, and plays by significant writers in a century that includes two world wars fought in Europe.  We will also view several European films.  No previous knowledge of European literature or languages is necessary. Suggested pre-requisite: ENG 205.

375-001
American and British Poetry since 1945
Alex Porco
MWF 9:00-9:50
MO 104
In 1960, Donald Allen put together The New American Poetry, 1945-1960, a groundbreaking anthology that, as poetry critic Marjorie Perloff suggests, “determined the direction poetry would take in the second half of the century.” Indeed, Jerome Rothenberg has gone so far as to refer to Allen’s anthology as “prophetic.” The book included poets such as Charles Olson, Robert Creeley, Robert Duncan, Jack Spicer, LeRoi Jones, Barbara Guest, Helen Adam, Frank O’Hara, and John Ashbery, among many, many others: “They are our avant-garde, the true continuers of the modern movement in American poetry,” to quote Allen. Thus, our course will explore just what constitutes the so-called “New American Poetry” by focusing on The Black Mountain School of Poetry, The San Francisco Renaissance, The New York School of Poetry, and the Black Arts Movement. In addition, we’ll consider the influence of the New American Poetry in the UK (Gael Turnbull, Tom Raworth, Elaine Feinstein) and Canada (Victor Coleman, Daphne Marlatt). Finally, this course is interdisciplinary: thus, we’ll consider how the New American Poetry intersects with changes in the fields of music (especially jazz), dance, drama, and the visual arts. Attendance and participation are essential to success in the course; also, students will be expected to complete multiple formal and informal presentations.

381-001                       MWF 10:00-10:50
381-002                       MWF 11:00-11:50
Literature for Young Adults
Katie Peel
MO 205
This semester we will explore constructions of both young adult literature and the young adult, with a particular eye towards issues of agency. We will look at the history of young adult literature from the eighteenth- and nineteenth-century conduct books, to the post-war phenomenon of the American teenager, to current young adult literature and authors. We will consider issues of genre (including both fiction and non-fiction), marketing, and, of course, censorship. We will discuss the goals and agendas of young adult literature, especially when it comes to identity formation, and will pay special attention to how young adult literature handles issues of “otherness,” particularly in depictions of gender, race, ethnicity, sexuality, ability, and age. Our texts range from canonical to contemporary, and include diaries, poetry, novels, and one graphic novel. Part of young adulthood entails gaining and negotiating power in the move from childhood to adulthood, but this is often a source of conflict between young adults and the adults in their lives. In looking at these representations of young adulthood (most often written and produced by adults), where can we locate narrative young adult agency in cultures that often disprivilege them? How do young adults and their narratives overcome disempowerment?

382-001
Ways of Teaching Literature
Michelle Manning
TR 2:00-3:15
MO 202
he “I Don’t Like English” Literature Class: Although primarily designed for English Education majors who are working towards teacher licensure K-12, this class is open to all students interested in analyzing how literature is taught. Using an intertextual or “transactional” pedagogical approach to the study of literature, this course seeks strategies to engage even the most reluctant readers in the class by using dark themes as a way to entice resistant readers, especially male students who studies show lag significantly behind female readers. In addition to popular texts, students read challenged, banned or censored selections from all levels (elementary to high school) to reflect on their own individual responses and experiences to literature, to examine the underlying pedagogy of best practices, and then to create lessons incorporating those theories. We will learn the basics of connecting classics to contemporary texts, using more relatable, engaging, and even simpler texts to lead students to a deeper understanding of a more difficult text. By making connections to past texts they have encountered, examining strategies that past teachers have used, and connecting to others in their course community, students will learn how to use innovative and age-appropriate teaching methods.

383-001
Classics Reconsidered
Victor Malo
MWF 10:00-10:50
MO 101
This course will examine works of poetry, fiction, and drama that are commonly taught in high school English classes.  During our interrogation of texts, we will utilize various critical lenses to reveal traditional and alternative interpretations.  Moreover, we will question what constitutes a literary ‘classic,’ who labels classics, and how issues of race, gender, class, religion, and language influence what is commonly taught in high school English classes.  Issues of censorship as well as the influence of the Common Core exemplar text list will also be addressed.

384-001
Reading Popular Culture
Nicholas Laudadio
TR 12:30-1:45
MO 101
This course will examine the theories and practices involved in critiquing popular culture as an aesthetic and economic phenomenon. Paying attention to the popular in culture and the culture of the popular, we will be exploring a wide range of texts and media--short films, music, advertisements, and television--in an attempt to understand cultural texts as an integral part of our modern intellectual landscape. Please note that we will spend no small amount of time and effort working with the critical and cultural theory that must accompany any focused, scholarly discussion of culture.

387-001                       TR 11:00-12:15
387-002                       TR 2:00-3:15
History of literary Critical and Theory
Janet Ellerby
MO 201
In 1821, when Percy Bysshe Shelley wrote, “Poets are the unacknowledged legislators of the world,” he impressed on his readers the crucial role of the arts in an ethical world. In this course, we will take up Shelley’s ideas as well as those of Plato, Aristotle, Wollstonecraft, Marx, Nietzsche, and Derrida, to name a few. We will delve into issues such as truth, power, identity, creativity, and aesthetics. We will ask our theorists and ourselves, what is the purpose of literature? What is the role of the poet/writer in creating a more ethical world? Why is critical awareness important equipment for living? Taking our cue from theorists like Plato and Emerson, who foreground conversation as the most vital approach to learning, we will make discussion the key mode for this course. Text: The Critical Tradition, 3rd edition. Work to include: Informal responses, 2 essay tests, 1 formal paper.

389-001
Rhetorical Theory since 1900
Anthony Atkins
TR 11:00-12:15
MO 202
This course picks up just after the 19th century rhetoricians. Students will be exposed to 20th and 21st century rhetoricians and the history or rhetoric. While rhetoricians like Kenneth Burke and I.A. Richards are rhetoricians who make significant contributions to rhetorical theory, we will also view Donna Haraway and N. Kathryn Hales as twenty-first century rhetoricians.

Rhetoric, argument, and persuasion are intricately connected, and understanding the nature of how persuasion and rhetoric can enhance the impact of communication is necessary for critical thinking and critical analyses of culture, politics, and everyday social situations. The goal of the course is to give students a solid history of rhetoric in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. At the end of the course, we want to rethink what it means to be a twenty-first century rhetorician.

390-001
Studies in Literature:  The Beat Generation and American Culture
Michael Wentworth
TR 11:00-12:15
MO 106
“O man, I have to tell you NOW I have IT.”  And you will, too, once you’ve got a ticket to ride far into the endless American night in the bad company of such notorious tour guides as Jack Kerouac, Neal Cassady, “Wild Bill” Borroughs, Allan Ginsberg, John Clellon Holmes, Gary Snyder, Lawrence Ferlinghetti, and other of their equally disaffected beat confederates.  Spend some time with “the Holy Goof,” a veritable “Don Quixote of tenderness,” a demon of fantastic anarchy, the “cool man,” the “prelate of junk,” and “a real realist with a real tale to tell” and discover who gave away his last $2.27 on January 17, 1956 and to whom, who intends to retire to the Lake Isle of Manisfree before it’s too late, and what you’d serve Jack Kerouac for dinner.  Or imagine you’re walking down the street on your way to clinch an important business deal when, anxious about the time, you check your watch only to find to your utter dismay that your Rolex has stopped.  You notice a stranger, who just happens to be Neal Cassady, and you nervously ask him for the time.  Find out what, exactly, Cassady’s response would be. 

One of the most significant, and certainly the best-known, social and cultural movements of the 1950s was the Beat Movement, a movement that even its most notorious spokespersons were hard-pressed to define, and even then in fairly ambiguous terms.  John Clellon Holmes, in his essay “The Philosophy of the Beat Generation” (1958), states the case directly:

            Providing a word that crystallizes the characteristics of an entire generation has always been a thankless task. . . . But to find a word that will describe the group that is now roughly between the ages of eighteen and twenty-eight . . . is even           more difficult, because this group includes veterans of three distinct kinds of           modern war: a hot war, a cold war, and a war that was stubbornly not called a war     at all, but a police action.

The “crystallizing” word, of course, was “beat,” and it originated, as Holmes recalls in a later essay “The Name of the Game,” in “the middle of a long, intense, only half-serious conversation” between Jack Kerouac and Holmes in November 1948.  Holmes had been goading Kerouac to describe “the peculiar quality of mind” projected by “the young hipsters of Times Square” as they walked down the street--“watchful, catlike, inquisitive, close to the buildings, in the street, but not of it”—and Kerouac responded,

            “It’s a sort of furtiveness. . . . Like we were a generation of furtives.  You know, with an inner knowledge there’s no use flaunting on that level, the level of the
‘public,’ a kind of beatness—I mean, being right down to it, to ourselves,
because we all really know where we are—and a weariness with all the forms, all the  conventions of the world. . . . It’s something like that.  So I guess you might say        we’re a beat generation.”

Holmes himself elaborates, though no less elusively than Kerouac, on “beatness” or “being beat”:

            Everyone who has lived through a war, any sort of war, knows that beat means not so much weariness, as rawness of the nerves; not so much being “filled up to here,” as being emptied out.  It describes a state of mind from which all essentials have been stripped, leaving it receptive to everything around it, but impatient with trivial obstructions.  To be beat is to be at the bottom of your personality, looking up; to be existential in the Kierkegaard, rather than the Jean-Paul Sartre, sense.

            (“The Philosophy of the Beat Generation”)

More specific than the state of Beat consciousness described by Kerouac and Holmes are those characteristic manifestations of such a state, manifestations closely identified in the popular imagination with the essential Beat character: a passive resistance to “square society”; an attraction to “far-out experiences” (sex, drugs, jazz) as more authentic than conventional forms of experience; a predilection for eccentric forms of expression; the absolute belief in “the creative power of the individual soul” (hence, the Beats’ adulation of such artists as Charlie Parker, James, Dean, and Dylan Thomas) and a more general insistence upon the self-determining autonomy of the individual.  For Holmes, however, the most distinctive and significant attribute of the Beat Generation is its spiritual quest for meaning, purpose, and value in a world where the pursuit of such goals applies, if at all, only in the most superficial and crassly materialistic sense.  Thus, according to Holmes, the dilemma confronting the Beat Generation “might be described as the will to believe even in the face of the inability to do so in conventional terms” (“The Philosophy of the Beat Generation”).  Speaking of Kerouac’s On the Road, Holmes observes that what makes Kerouac’s characters “beat” is the fact that even though they rushed back and forth across the country on the slightest pretext, gathering kicks along the way, their real journey was inward; and if they seemed to trespass most boundaries, legal and moral, it was only the hope of finding a belief on the other side. (“The Philosophy”)

Later, noting, once again, the Beat Generation’s relentless search for answers, which may ultimately lead to jail or madness or death (one recalls the “best minds” of Ginsberg’s generation as depicted in Howl), Holmes summarizes that they may never find the faith that Kerouac believes is at the end of their road. 

            But on one thing they would all agree: the valueless abyss of modern life is             unbearable. (“The Philosophy,” italics added)

What this all means should become progressively evident through our reading of key “Beat” texts across a variety of genres.  Along the way, we will discover and investigate a number of recurring themes and issues such as the notion of friendship and community, the visionary experience of the road, self-adventuring and experimental lifestyles, the prerogatives and responsibilities of the creative artist, and the quest for self-enlightenment.  We will also examine the uneasy affiliation of the Beat movement with mainstream American society in the late 1940s and the 1950s, a period that witnessed an unprecedented rise in economic prosperity and earned income which, in turn, triggered an equally unprecedented rise in consumerism, home ownership, and marriage and birth rates.  We will likewise examine the Beat movement’s revisionary critique of such traditional American values as material success, endless abundance, technology as savior, and the idea of America as a special nation even as we examine the Beats’ radical reaffirmation of other traditional American values such as self-reliance, individual freedom, the primacy of experience, and the open road as a means of self-discovery and self-illumination.  In addition, we will attempt to discover, through our interactive contact with our assigned readings, what was so distinctive about the beat experience in terms of the various interests, attitudes, values, convictions, and aspirations that defined that experience and to determine to what extent such experience is still resonant with the experience of subsequent generations, including, of course, your own.  The latter consideration is of special interest to me since the “Beat” movement seems no less appealing and fascinating now than it was nearly twenty years ago when I first taught this course.  So, what’s the “big deal,” anyway?  In answering this question, you should ultimately discover as much about yourselves, however distantly situated in time and place from the “original scene,” as you do about such legendary figures as Jack Kerouac, Neal Cassady, William Burroughs, and Allen Ginsberg who, though long since dead, continue to haunt the American cultural landscape.  As a special dimension to the course we will examine the role of women in the Beat Movement by reading Joyce Johnson’s Minor Characters and Hettie Jones’ How I Became Jones and will also investigate the extended legacy and influence of the Beats not only in the counter-culture of the 60s but in the present and recent past as well. Finally, to round things off, we’ll finish the semester by reading William Kotzwinkle’s The Fan Man, a post-beat narrative featuring the most utterly zany and eccentrically visionary character (Horse Badorties) you’re ever likely to encounter.  Required Texts: William Burroughs, Junky, (50th Anniversary Edition); Ann Charters, The Portable Beat Reader; John Clellon Holmes, Go; Lawrence Ferlinghetti, A Coney Island of the Mind; Joyce Johnson, Minor Characters: A Young Woman’s Coming-of-Age in the Beat Orbit of Jack Kerouac; Hettie Jones, How I Became Hettie Jones; Jack Kerouac, Road Novels: 1957-60: On the Road; Dharma Bums, Tristessa, and The Subterraneans; William Kotzwinkle, The Fan Man; Gary Snyder, The Gary Snyder Reader: Poetry, Prose, Translations.

490-001
Topics in Literature: Gothic Rise and Dreadful Remains
Mark Boren
TR 9:30-10:45
MO 201
This course will follow the rise of the Gothic in literature from its inception to the present. The genre deals with such things as the supernatural, sexual ambiguity, violence, and myriad marginalized social human practices and beliefs, andthe works belonging to this genre follow well-developed and highly complex structures. Using psychoanalytic and genre theory, we’ll analyze the Gothic as both literary and social phenomena in order to reveal how this genre of deviance, which is more pervasive today than ever, functions to define less “deviant” genres and texts.

495-001
Senior Seminar: “Fairy Tale Traditions”
Meghan Sweeney
MW 2:00-3:15
MO 201
Mermaids who walk, ogres who devour small children, and miniature men who are baked into puddings.

The focus of our course will be the many tales of what Jack Zipes calls “the great fairy tale tradition,” as well as a variety of illustrated books, stories, and films they have inspired. We’ll explore the staying power of these tales and think about why there are so many televisual and filmic adaptations at this particular cultural moment. As a capstone course students will have the opportunity to draw on their accumulated experience in analysis and research. Students should expect to be active participants in class discussion and to write a number of short papers as well as a substantial final paper at the end of the semester. Texts include: Maria Tatar, ed.  The Classic Fairy Tales; Kate Bernheimer, ed. My Mother, She Killed Me, My Father He Ate Me.

495-002
Senior Seminar:  Trauma and Romanticism
Katherine Montwieler
W 3:30-6:15
MO 102
The Age of Romanticism was marked by crises: political and personal.  The American Revolution, the French Revolution, the Haitian Revolution, and the Industrial Revolution were profound global events that forever changed the history of the world.  Perhaps political instability led British writers of the early nineteenth century inward: to reflect on their own lives, which they soon realized were as complex, incoherent, and damaged as the political stage they shared with the world’s citizens.  In this class, we’ll explore how trauma, which the Oxford English Dictionary defines as “a wound or external bodily injury” and “a psychic injury, especially one caused by emotional shock the memory of which is repressed and remains unhealed,” figures within British literature composed between 1780-1830.  We’ll look at representations of traumatic events in the work of William Blake, William Godwin, Mary Wollstonecraft, the Shelleys, Byron, and other writers as we explore its renderings, scars, and reverberations in works that still resonate today.

496-001
Senior Seminar:  Field of Study in Composition and Rhetoric
Anthony Atkins
TR 12:30-1:45
MO 202
This senior seminar pull apart the fields of composition and rhetoric. The course will focus on the following disciplines: history of rhetoric, history of composition studies, computers and composition, professional writing, writing center theory, writing program administration, and basic (developmental) writing. The course will require both traditional essays and research as well as multimedia projects and presentations. Students will also be required to compile an electronic portfolio. Basic knowledge of technology is highly recommended. This senior seminar is designed for students in the Professional Writing major or working toward the Professional Writing Certificate.

496-002
Senior Seminar: Gender, Sexualities and Technologies
Colleen Reilly
TR 2:00-3:15
MO 204
In this course, we will explore the intersections of genders, sexualities, and technologies theoretically and practically. Technologies, including computers, computer games, radios, microwave ovens, vibrators, and automobiles, to name a few, are both shaped by and participate in reinforcing dominant notions of genders and sexualities. We will examine representations of genders, sexualities, and technologies in a range of theoretical, historical, cultural, and fictional texts as well as in visual and multimedia productions, including art and film. Course projects will include media projects, papers, and presentations.

 


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