Student resources

Getting library help is often your first step in any writing assignment. This set of links will help you get started.

Writing Center

This free, one-on-one tutoring center will help you focus and revise your compositions. Here are some resources.

Writing Center

This free, one-on-one tutoring center will help you focus and revise your compositions. Here are some online handouts to get you started.

Hours

Click on the link to bring up the current Writing Center hours.

navigating the center

Don't know how to schedule an appointment? Confused as to what you should bring to your Writing Center consultation? Everything is answered here.

How to study

If deadlines make you tear out your hair, here is a nice place to start. Check out the study guides, sample timetables, handouts and links at this Writing Center page.


 
   
   
Rebecca Skloot, award-winning author who has received wide acclaim for her work as a science and medical writer in Columbia Journalism Review; Discover; The New York Times Magazine; O, The Oprah Magazine; and Prevention; among other publications, spoke in March at UNCW's Kenan Auditorium. Skloot’s bestselling first book was The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks. UNCW Photo by Jamie Moncrief

Undergraduate Course Descriptions

SUMMER I 2015

 

204-800
Introduction to Professional Writing
Dr. Ray
Online
This course prepares you to face workplace challenges that require professional communication skills in terms of writing and presentation. It will enable you to develop critical appreciation for core technical concepts including audience, context, persuasion, and purpose in writing situations with an emphasis on ethics in communication. You will be exposed to writing a variety of business collaterals, such as resumes, memos, proposals and reports in different contexts and for different purposes. Additionally, this course puts a huge emphasis on information design from a visual communication framework and challenges students to create technical documents from a defined visual perspective. Most importantly, you will find opportunities to collaborate with peers to share expertise, knowledge, and experience in a service-learning framework. By the end of this course, you will learn to design effective technical documents to solve problems with attention to text, visuals, format, usability, and citation. Textbook: Johnson-Sheehan, Technical Communication Today 4th ed.

204-801
Introduction to Professional Writing
Ms. Cosgrove
Online
Introduction to Professional Writing is an introductory survey of concepts in professional writing, including audience analysis, research methods, visual thinking, and the composing process. This course includes a service-learning component.

204-805
Introduction to Professional Writing
Dr. Cummings
Online
In this class, you will reflect on how rhetoric and visual design can inform effective communication in collaborative and technologically diverse contexts. Using print and online tools, you will explore the composing process through invention, collaboration, audience analysis, and revision. Besides composing traditional professional genres, like memos, proposals, instructions, and public relations materials, you will also reflect on how these can be redesigned and delivered in digital and networked contexts. Consequently, you will be required to experiment with various emerging Web 2.0 technologies, culminating in a major design project purposed for a specific professional audience. This course will enhance your ability to compose well-designed, persuasive, and purposeful texts in a variety of professional and academic contexts.

209-001
Classical Literature in Translation
Dr. Walker
MTWR 10:15-12:20
MO 207
The classical writings of ancient Greece and Rome are still very much alive in the multiple ways they have influenced our culture. We will sample a rich variety of texts that still speak to us today, including Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey (courage, heroism, living by one’s wits, wandering and returning home); tragedy by Aeschylus (Agamemnon [religious devotion vs. family loyalty, adultery, revenge]); philosophy by Plato (Apology of Socrates [devotion to personal principles vs. duty to the nation or state]); lyric poetry by Catullus (celebration of and cynicism about forbidden heterosexual love) and Sappho (lesbian love); Virgil’s epic The Aeneid (duty to the gods vs. passionate personal love); Ovid’s Metamorphoses (memorable accounts of the transformations of form that take place in classical myths). We will also give some attention to the influence of classical works on later literature and on our culture today. Reading quizzes, class participation, written responses, two tests.  Text: The Norton Anthology of Western Literature. 9th ed. Vol. 1. Ed. Martin Puchner. 

211-001
British Literature to 1800
Dr. Wentworth
MTWR 12:30-2:35
MO 201
As a survey of British literature from Beowulf (first recited in the eighth century) to the death of Samuel Johnson (1784), the course will consider such major authors as Geoffrey Chaucer, Christopher Marlowe, Ben Jonson, John Milton, Jonathan Swift, and Samuel Johnson; a broad variety of genres, including narrative poetry, utopian fiction, tragedy, comedy, Christian epic, travel narrative, biography, and the periodical essay; topical and thematic concerns such as wit, imagination, art and nature, reason and passion, life choices, happiness, gender roles, marriage, and crime and punishment; such concerns as the value and purpose of literature, strategies of interpretation, and various factors that figure into the enduring permanence of our featured writers; and the relevance of selected works to other works of literature students have read, the current arena of local, national and international affairs, contemporary popular culture, and other academic courses students have taken.  In addition to such standard canonical texts as Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, Sir Thomas More’s Utopia,   Christopher Marlowe’s Doctor Faustus,  Ben Jonson’s Volpone, and John Milton’s Paradise Lost, we will also be reading and discussing a number of texts with which you are most likely familiar such as Mary Astell’s “Some Reflections upon Marriage,” Daniel Defoe’s “The Cons of Marriage,” Aphra Behn’s prose novella Oroonoko, or The Royal Slave, Eliza Haywood’s prose novella Fantomima; or, Love in a Maze, Jonathan Swift’s “The Lady’s Dressing Room,” and Samuel Johnson’s prose novella The History of Rasselas, Prince of Abyssinia.    Required texts:  Geoffrey Chaucer, The Canterbury Tales (translated into modern English by Nevill Coghill);    The Norton Anthology of English Literature, Vol. 1B: The Sixteenth Century and the Early Seventeenth Century;  The Norton Anthology of English Literature, Vol C: The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century.

232-800
African American Literature
Dr. Marlon
Online
This class will focus on major writers and literary themes of the Harlem Renaissance Era. Requirements: Weekly quizzes and one major essay. Textbook: Norton Anthology of African American Literature, 3rd ed., Volume One.  This is an online course.

312-800
Writing for Business
Ms. Mathews
Online
Professional writing is not just crossing the T's and dotting the I's. Writing on the job requires knowing the types of documents that are familiar to our bosses and co-workers, so they can find information quickly. Each of these documents has certain conventions and requirements we need to master to communicate effectively - and efficiently - in the workplace. In this course, we will focus on analyzing and producing rhetorically effective workplace writing with an eye to audience awareness, using different genres, and developing a professional tone throughout. Students will work individually and in groups on projects that range from letters and resumes to reports and proposals. The course is suitable for students of any major who want to improve their professional writing skills and thus their career potential. Text: Meyer, Sebranek, and Van Rhys, Write for Business/A Compact Guide to Writing & Communicating in the Workplace.

332-001
Shakespeare: Early Plays/Poems
Dr. Walker
MTWR 8:00-10:05
MO 201
The course covers six plays chosen from those written in the first half of Shakespeare’s career to represent the major genres of tragedy (Titus Andronicus), history (Henry VI, Richard III), comedy (A Midsummer Night’s Dream)  narrative poem (The Rape of Lucrece).We will give attention to such matters as cultural context, gender, genre, and performance. Informal responses, reading quizzes, oral presentation, critical paper of 2000 words, midterm, and final.  Text: The Complete Works of Shakespeare. Ed. David Bevington. 7th ed.

381-001
Literature for Young Adults
Dr. Malo
MTWR 10:15-12:20
MO 201
There is no better time to read young adult literature than the summer and this course will provide you with the best beach reading available: the “canon” of young adult literature.  In this course we will read seminal titles as well as some modern “classics,” and will interrogate texts from various critical lenses discussing issues such as censorship, race, gender, class, and sexual orientation and identity. 

390-800
LGBT Studies in Literature
Dr. Moore
Online
This course introduces students to major frameworks and debates in the field of lesbian-gay-bisexual-transgender studies and aims to cultivate a sexuality studies methodology for literary analysis. Requirements include weekly concept quizzes and short analytical essays that apply various LGBT frameworks to the study of literature.  Textbook: Finding Out: An Introduction to LGBT Studies, Second Edition (Sage, 2014) and other texts provided by instructor coursepack.  This is an online course.

 

Course Descriptions Summer II 2015

204-802
Introduction to Professional Writing
Dr. Atkins
Online
Students should have basic technology skills and have access to the internet and Blackboard. Students should have basic technology skills (adept with email, attachments, blackboard, etc.). The course will introduce students to strands of Professional Writing like design, resume writing, and multimedia. Students will also review and evaluate a number of online and traditional texts ranging from websites to professional reports. Students will also learn multiple theories of professional writing. While students will work with traditional documents, they will also address the integration of multimedia. 

Access to Blackboard and the internet for the full second summer session is required by all students.

204-803
Introduction to Professional Writing
Dr. Ray
Online
This course prepares you to face workplace challenges that require professional communication skills in terms of writing and presentation. It will enable you to develop critical appreciation for core technical concepts including audience, context, persuasion, and purpose in writing situations with an emphasis on ethics in communication. You will be exposed to writing a variety of business collaterals, such as resumes, memos, proposals and reports in different contexts and for different purposes. Additionally, this course puts a huge emphasis on information design from a visual communication framework and challenges students to create technical documents from a defined visual perspective. Most importantly, you will find opportunities to collaborate with peers to share expertise, knowledge, and experience in a service-learning framework. By the end of this course, you will learn to design effective technical documents to solve problems with attention to text, visuals, format, usability, and citation. . Textbook: Johnson-Sheehan, Technical Communication Today. 4th ed.

204-804
Introduction to Professional Writing
Dr. Reilly
Online
This course introduces students to professional writing as a field of study while providing instruction in organizational research and writing skills beneficial to students from any discipline. Students will learn to analyze writing situations and produce both print and electronic texts, such as memos, email, documentation, and websites, for use in organizational contexts. Course work includes writing projects and presentations and involves service learning.  All course material will be freely available online.

205-001
Introduction to Literary Studies
Dr. Gilbert
MTWR 10:15-12:20
MO 202
Having patiently copied every word in the prison library’s dictionary and read every book in the library’s collections, Malcolm X realized, “I had never been so truly free in my life. . . . [A] new world opened to me, of being able to read and understand.”  Indeed, literature is more than words etched on a page; it is and can be a source of personal, political, social, and cultural liberation.  In this course, we will study a mixture of genres and narratives with an eye toward shaping our responses to a particular text and constructing meaning in a collaborative setting.  Assignments may include several critical essays and a presentation. 

210-800
Mythology
Dr. Porco
Online
In this course, students will become familiar with Greek, Roman, and Norse Mythology, as well as myths from other cultures— from King Arthur and Camelot (England) to the Trickster and Badman (Africa), from Celtic myths (Ireland) to comic book mythology (Marvel and DC). In addition to analysis of myths, students will learn different approaches to the study of mythology. They will also explore how mythological narratives affect our own culture and can inform our reading of literature. Students will spend time considering the recent cultural interest in superheroes (e.g., why are “origin stories” so important in comic book mythology?); the presence of Trickster and Badman figures in rap music and hip-hop culture (e.g., from N.W.A. to the Notorious B.I.G.); and the ways in which contemporary writers revise and rewrite traditional myths.

This is a fully online course. Assignments may include weekly discussion board participation, short quizzes, and writing activities (formal and informal).

306-800
Essay Writing
Dr. Kamenish
Online

314-800
Writing and Technology
Dr. Atkins
Online
Students should have access to the internet and Blackboard. Students should have basic technology skills (adept with email, attachments, blackboard, etc.). The course will focus on the design of writing and composing as well as the multimedia technologies used to produce and distribute them. Students will also research both traditional and contemporary theories of professional writing. The multimedia technologies and design strategies we experience in the course will be useful in careers associated with professional writers and professional communicators.

Access to Blackboard and the internet throughout the full second summer session is required by all students.

390-002
Studies in Literature
Dr. Wentworth
MTWR 12:30-2:35
MO 207
“Many native traditions held clowns and tricksters as essential to any contact with the sacred.  People could not pray until they had laughed, because laughter opens and frees from rigid preconception.  Humans had to have tricksters within the most sacred ceremonies lest they forget the sacred comes through upset, reversal, surprise.  The trickster in most native traditions is essential to creation, to birth.” (Professor Byrd Gibbens, Professor of English, University of Arkansas at Little Rock.  From a letter to George Carlin.)

Regardless of the expression “laughing like a hyena,” laughter is supposedly unique to the human species.  So it would seem, if only in terms of the human condition, that “laughing matters.”  Come to think of it, we all enjoy a good laugh, whether the source of such voluble risibility is an off-color limerick, another befuddling day in the life of Homer Simpson, Cosmo Kramer’s latest “brilliant brain scheme,” the “funny papers,” or, in the case of our course, the manic adolescent escapades of Paul Feig,  George Carlin’s irreverent rants on everything under the sun (and moon, for that matter), the assorted true-life misadventures of David Sedaris and Beth Lisick, Bill Bryson’s hilarious account of hiking the Appalachian Trail, and Dave Barry’s reflections on the absolutely worst American pop lyrics ever written—all of which should confirm beyond a doubt that, indeed, “laughter is the best medicine.”  Featured texts include Paul Feig, Kick Me: Adventures in Adolescence;  David Sedaris, Naked; Celia Rivenbark, We’re Just Like You, Only Prettier: Confessions of a Tarnished Southern Belle;  Bill Bryson, A Walk in the Woods: Rediscovering America on the Appalachian Trail; Beth Lisick, Everybody into the Pool; Dave Barry, Dave Barry’s Book of Bad Songs; George Carlin, Napalm and Silly Putty; Garrison Keillor, Lake Woebegone Days; and Simon J. Bronner, Piled Higher and Deeper: The Folklore of Campus Life—Legends, Beliefs, Songs, Games, Jokes, Festivals, Slang, Ghost Stories and Other Traditions from American Colleges and Universities.

 


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