BFA Course Descriptions

*Note: for day & time information, please go to SeaNet and search for courses.
Click here for the 2015–16 undergraduate catalogue course descriptions (includes pre-/co-requisite requirements for each course).

 

Spring 2016


CRW 201: INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING
Text: Show & Tell 6th ed.
Introduction to the principles and techniques of creative writing, aimed at developing the creative process. Includes lectures, reading, and writing exercises in poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction. Partially satisfies University Studies II: Approaches and Perspectives/Aesthetic, Interpretive, and Literary Perspectives.

CRW 201-006: INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING, ALLEN A
Texts: Show and Tell 6th Ed., T.C. Boyle, Ed, Best American Short Stories 2015, Tony Hoagland, Real Sofistikashun.
The aim of this course is to introduce students to writing in three creative genres: poetry, short fiction, and nonfiction through extensive reading, in-class and take-home writing assignments, and classroom discussion and workshops. Whether you’re considering an undergraduate degree in creative writing at UNCW, looking to make progress towards the University Studies requirement, or are simply curious about the art of writing, this introductory-level course strives to create an inclusive environment where writers of all skill levels will have an opportunity to develop as artists & thinkers, students & scholars. You’ll finish the semester with a polished portfolio of finished work in the three genres, and hopefully equipped with a greater appreciation and understanding of humankind’s long-standing engagement with storytelling, song, and the self.

CRW 201-007: INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING, DIDIER E
Text:Show & Tell 6th Ed., various handouts, and student work.
In this introductory course we will discuss the basic terminology, principles, and techniques for writing poetry, fiction, and nonfiction. With the aid of published examples, prompts, and exercises, students will write their own original material in each genre for the class to discuss. Our course will then conclude with a final portfolio of students’ revised creative work. This course does not intend to measure the artistic talents of its students, but rather inure students to the idea that art is work

CRW 201-008, INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING:  LUNDIN M
Text: Show & Tell, 6th Edition, various handouts, student work
In this course students will be exposed to the three major genres of creative writing: poetry, nonfiction, and fiction. They will learn the basic principles and terminology required to successfully discuss not only published work, but their own as well. Coursework includes weekly writing prompts, readings, and discussion.

CRW 201-009: INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING, APFELD B
Text: Show & Tell 6th Ed.
This class offers an introduction to the principles and techniques of creative writing in the three major genres: poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction. Through regular readings and writing exercises, students will develop a critical vocabulary and will begin to explore their own writing aesthetic. Coursework and assignments will include readings, writing exercises, and workshop sessions; students will submit a final portfolio of revised work. As a discussion-based class, students are expected to be engaged participants, active listeners, and to attend class regularly. This course partially satisfies University Studies II: Approaches and Perspectives/Aesthetic, Interpretive, and Literary Perspectives.

CRW 201-010: INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING, BRADFORD J
Text: Show & Tell 6th Ed., various handouts, and student work.
In this introductory course you will learn the basic terminology, principles, and techniques for writing poetry, fiction, and nonfiction. With the aid of prompts and exercises, you will write your own original material in each genre, which we will discuss in class. The course will conclude with a portfolio of your revised, creative work. Partially satisfies University Studies II: Approaches and Perspectives/Aesthetic, Interpretive, and Literary Perspectives.

CRW 201-011: INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING, CLARK C
This course provides an introduction to the basic craft techniques of creative writing in three major genres—fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction—and is aimed at developing the student’s creative process. Students will read a variety of short stories, poems, essays, and memoirs and engage in class discussions. Prompts and writing exercises will be provided inside and outside of class to inspire students to generate their own original material in each genre. Writing workshops in each genre will give students a chance to share their work and receive constructive, supportive feedback. As a discussion-based, creative class, students are expected to be engaged participants, active listeners, and attend class regularly. This course partially satisfies University Studies II: Approaches and Perspectives/Aesthetic, Interpretive, and Literary Perspectives.

CRW 201-012: INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING, PALMER A
Text: Show & Tell 6th Ed., various handouts, and student work
This class offers students an introduction to the principles and techniques of creative writing in poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction. Coursework will focus on developing the student's creative process and knowledge base in each genre and will include reading assignments, writing exercises, and workshop sessions. Over the course of the semester, students will produce original material in each genre, which they will ultimately revise and collect in individual creative portfolios. This class is discussion-based, and students are expected to be engaged participants, active in its making. This course partially satisfies University Studies II: Approaches and Perspectives/Aesthetic, Interpretive, and Literary Perspectives.

CRW 201-013: INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING, RAMOS M
Text: Show & Tell 6th Ed., various handouts, and student work.
This class offers an introduction to the basic principles and techniques of creative writing in the three major genres--poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction--and is aimed at developing the student's creative process. Coursework and assignments will include regular readings and writing exercises, workshop sessions, and culminate in a portfolio of revised student work. As a discussion-based class, students are expected to be engaged participants, active listeners, and to attend class regularly. This course partially satisfies University Studies II: Approaches and Perspectives/Aesthetic, Interpretive, and Literary Perspectives.

CRW 201-014 (online): INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING, SHUBERT C
Text: Show & Tell 6th Ed., various handouts on Blackboard, and student work.
In this introductory course you will learn the basic terminology, principles, and techniques for writing poetry, fiction, and nonfiction by reading great literary works as well as craft essays by writers, by reflecting on what makes for good writing in reading journals, and by taking brief reading quizzes. Furthermore, you will enhance your knowledge of various online platforms for e-learning as well as hone your "netiquette": that is, how you comport yourself professionally online with your colleagues and instructor. With the aid of online prompts and exercises, you will write your own original material in each genre, which we will critique as a class through blackboard. The course will conclude with a portfolio of your own revised, creative work, from which the bulk of the final grade will be determined. Partially satisfies University Studies II: Approaches and Perspectives/Aesthetic, Interpretive, and Literary Perspectives. Students need be advised that though the online format gives them more flexibility during the week in terms of when they choose to complete activities, they will be penalized for not logging in and fulfilling each weekly assignment by Friday evenings. As such, it is imperative students stay organized and responsible for their work starting Day 1 of the course. No late work will be accepted for credit.

CRW 203-001: FORMS OF CREATIVE WRITING, BUCHANAN L
This course is an introduction to the major forms of creative writing and the art of reading as a writer. Students will read works of drama, poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction and discuss them in terms of craft elements and artistic techniques. They will be asked to respond to their readings analytically, in class discussions and critical essays, as well as creatively, in creative exercises and writing activities. Students will also learn to explore and develop the craft they put into their own creative work. This is a reading intensive course with a final exam.

CRW 203-002: FORMS OF CREATIVE WRITING, THOMAS J
In this class, we will study the forms of four literary genres—fiction, poetry, drama, and creative nonfiction. We will read texts across time, history, and culture, to see the way form affects content, and the literary work as a whole, and analyze how form changes and adapts with time. From the Gothic novel to Modernism; from “Hamlet” to Walden; from Romantic literature to erasure poetry; we will focus on reading itself as the integral mode of becoming a writer. We will learn to read as a writer reads, but also, to write as a reader—a reader who is aware of the textual landscape which has preceded her, and thus, ultimately betters her writing potential. This class will require in-class discussion as well as analytical and creative writing. This class is not a workshop, however, and students should be prepared to focus particularly on reading and textual analysis.

CRW 203-003: FORMS OF CREATIVE WRITING, CLARK C
Texts: Natalie Diaz’s When My Brother was an Aztec, Mary Karr’s The Liar’s Club, Barbara Kingsolver’s The Bean Trees, Tennessee Williams’ Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, and additional texts on Blackboard. How do formal and stylistic choices in poetry and creative non-fiction contribute to the emotional piquancy within a work? How do novelists and playwrights go about fleshing out their characters? What are the similarities and differences in craft and style among the major literary forms? In this reading-intensive course we will study poetry, creative non-fiction, fiction, and drama to understand the artistic choices that go into the crafting of poems, memoirs, novels, and plays. This class will include in-class discussion as well as creative and analytical writing.  Students will read closely with an eye toward understanding form and craft. There will be a final exam at semester’s end.

CRW 207-001: FICTION WRITING, STORY N
Required Texts: The Art Of Fiction by John Gardner and the Scribner Anthology of Contemporary Short Fiction ed. Michael Martone
In this course, students will learn the fundamentals of fiction writing. We will do close readings of short fiction, think about craft and process, and write weekly creative exercises, culminating intwo full-length short stories. Our emphasis will be on experimentation and the production of written work rather than revision. Class participation, attendance, and a willingness to try new things are essential to ensure a quality workshop experience.

CRW 207-002: FICTION WRITING, APFELD B
Texts: The Vintage Book of Contemporary American Short Stories (Ed. Tobias Wolff); Making Shapely Fiction, Jerome Stern
In this class, students will explore the basic elements of fiction writing by both reading widely from published works, and also by writing and revising their own stories. Students will begin building a critical vocabulary and will become familiar with the technical aspects of fiction, in addition to engaging with the more intangible elements of stories: what draws us to fiction? why do we write it? what does fiction mean for us today? Coursework includes regular reading assignments and writing exercises, working toward full-length short stories; students will also participate in workshop sessions, and will submit a final portfolio of revised work at the end of the semester. Participation and attendance are essential, as this is a discussion-based course.

CRW 207-003 (online): FICTION WRITING, SHUBERT C
Texts: 30/30: Thirty American Stories from the Last Thirty Years (Ed. Porter Shreve & B. Minh Nguyen); Writing Fiction: A Guide to Narrative Craft, 8th edition, Janet Burroway
In this class, students will explore the basic elements of fiction writing by both reading widely from published works, and also by writing and revising their own stories. Students will begin building a critical vocabulary and will become familiar with the technical aspects of fiction, in addition to engaging with the more intangible elements of stories: what draws us to fiction? why do we write it? what does fiction mean for us today? Coursework includes regular reading assignments and writing exercises, working toward full-length short stories; students will also participate in workshop sessions, and will submit a final portfolio of revised work at the end of the semester. As this is an entirelyonline course, you will enhance your knowledge of various online platforms for e-learning as well as hone your "netiquette": that is, how you comport yourself professionally online with your colleagues and instructor. With the aid of online prompts and exercises, you will write your own original material in each genre, which we will critique as a class through blackboard. Students need be advised that though the online format gives them more flexibility during the week in terms of when they choose to complete activities, they will be penalized for not logging in and fulfilling each weekly assignment by Friday evenings. As such, it is imperative students stay organized and responsible for their work starting Day 1 of the course. No late work will be accepted for credit.

CRW 208-001: POETRY WRITING, BRADFORD J
Texts: TBD
This course will serve as an introduction to reading and writing poetry. We will read past and contemporary poets, and discuss the ways in which metaphor, imagery, and sound create tiny worlds for us to sing, and dance inside. You will write your own poems, which we will read and discuss with an eye toward revision. The class will culminate in a final exam and a portfolio of revised poems.

CRW 208-002: POETRY WRITING, WILSON E
Text: The Triggering Town by Richard Hugo, Ariel by Sylvia Plath (2004 ed.), and the Fall/Winter 2013 issue (Volume 40.1) of Black Warrior Review.
How does the artistic community frame conversations about poetry? In this course, we will examine the ways in which poems work as individual pieces of art, inside the collection of a single poet, and among the collaged pages of a literary journal. Through the experience of reading and analyzing poetry with an eye towards literary craft, style, and technique, students will develop as poets themselves as they produce original pieces to be workshopped throughout the semester. The semester’s efforts will culminate in a final portfolio composed of revised student work and a final paper on an element of craft in regards to either Ariel or the Fall/Winter 2013 issue of Black Warrior Review. Special emphasis will be given to creating and maintaining a safe space for all students, both academically and artistically, and to reading work by authors whose diverse identities often exclude them from the literary canon. This course partially satisfies University Studies II: Approaches and Perspectives/Aesthetic, Interpretive, and Literary Perspectives.

CRW 209-001: INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE NONFICTION, PALMER A
Texts: Touchstone Anthology of Contemporary Creative Nonfiction edited by Lex Williford and Michael Martone; supplementary essays on craft (provided via Blackboard); and student work
Some writers have described creative nonfiction as “the art of truth”; others, a genre of “true stories well told.” This introductory, discussion-based course will approach creative nonfiction in terms of truth, as well as imagination and craft. Students will learn what distinguishes creative nonfiction as a genre and develop their skills as nonfiction writers by completing a variety of writing and reading assignments that inform these objectives. Coursework will focus on the personal essay, lyric essay, and memoir/personal narrative. In addition, students will complete in-class exercises and respond to each other’s creative work via the workshop component of the class.

CRW 209-002: INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE NONFICTION, RAMOS M
Texts: On Writing Well: The Classic Guide to Writing Nonfiction by William Zinsser; The Best Creative Nonfiction Vol. 1 edited by Lee Gutkind.
What is creative nonfiction? What's the difference between a news story and creative nonfiction? An analytical essay and a personal one? Why do people read creative nonfiction at all? Creative nonfiction writers share their personal truth in the context of fact, taking inspiration from fiction, journalism, and poetry. In this introductory, discussion-based course, we will read and write extensively, learn to identify our own stories, and find engaging, unique ways to tell them. We will also complete in-class exercises and respond to each other’s' essays via the workshop.

 

CRW 302-001: FORMS OF CREATIVE NONFICTION, LEE R

 

CRW 303-001: FORMS OF POETRY, MÖRLING M
In this class we will consider forms and how they fit and inform the philosophical perspective of our poems. What choices do we make in crafting our poems? What is our process of selection? Are poems, like the bowls of the ancient Japanese potters, born? Or are they made? Emily Dickinson wrote: “Nature is a haunted house.Art--/a house that tries to be haunted.” How can our poems be as natural as possible, the form and the content inevitable to the point of near invisibility? The global designer Bruce Mau has said: “For most of us, design is invisible. Until it fails.” Is this what the 18th century Japanese poet Ryokan meant when he wrote: “Who says my poems are poems?/My poems are not poems,/ After you know my poems are not poems,/ Then we can begin to discuss poetry.”

CRW 306-001: FORMS OF FICTION, SIEGEL R
This course is an exploration of the major forms of literary fiction: the short story; the linked short-story collection; the novella; and the novel. We will read, write about and discuss examples of these forms with an eye to issues of craft, looking at how they are put together and how they work. The ultimate aim is to learn how to read like a writer.

CRW 307-001: INTERMEDIATE FICTION WRITING, WATSON L
Donald Barthelme said, “The aim of literature . . . is the creation of a strange object covered with fur which breaks your heart.” In this course we will break hearts with our writing. You will build on the fiction writing skills you’ve already learned, and in addition, you will learn to read like a writer. You will learn your strengths as writer, and via class discussion and the process of revision, you will learn how to improve your own writing, kill all your darlings, make your work break hearts, etc. This is a workshop based course in which we will analyze and discuss up to three pieces of your own writing, as well as discuss short fiction that will be handed out in class.

CRW 315-001: THE GRAPHIC NOVEL, GESSNER D
The main goals of this class are to give you an overview of the genre of graphic novels and to give you a language to discuss this emerging form.   To achieve these goals we will read from a broad, though admittedly far from comprehensive, range of graphic novels.  Secondarily, we will work on our own graphic projects.  It should be stressed that no art background is required for this.  Stick figures are okay. 

CRW 318-001: SCREENWRITING I: INTRODUCTION, BUTTINO L
(FST 318) Prerequisite or co-requisite: FST 201; or prerequisite: PCRW, CRW and CRW 207, CRW 208 or CRW 209; or permission of instructor. Theory and practice of screenwriting with an emphasis on the fundamentals of narrative structure. Students write original scripts, including a short screenplay for possible use in FST 495.

CRW 318-002: SCREENWRITING I: INTRODUCTION, LINEHAN T
(FST 318) Prerequisite: PCRW, PFST, CRW, or FST major; and CRW 207, CRW 208, CRW 209, or FST201or permission of instructor. Theory and practice of screenplays and/or documentary scripts for television and film with an emphasis on the fundamentals of narrative structure. Students write original scripts, including a short screenplay for possible use in FST 495.

CRW 320-001: ADVENTURE WRITING, HOLMAN V
This nonfiction course will take students far beyond the classroom. Our first adventure is scheduled for Sunday January 24 . This will be a three hour falconry experience run through the Cape Fear Raptor Center. Our second adventure (to be determined) will be a full day experience April 2. On each excursion, students will have the opportunity to observe, explore, interview, and take notes while in the field. Students will then use the skills developed during these experiences and through regular writing exercises to create, workshop, and revise their own adventure narrative. Students may expect to read books by Helen MacDonald (H IS FOR HAWK), Norman Maclean (YOUNG MEN AND FIRE), Jon Krakauer (INTO THE WILD), and Cheryl Strayed (WILD), as well as a variety of shorter works provided by the instructor.
A spirit of adventure (and attendance on both trips) is essential.

CRW 320-002: SPECIAL WORKSHOP IN POETRY, WHITE M
This workshop will take a different approach to poetry and storytelling. Course themes will include slam, rap, social justice, and storytelling, as well as the traditional poetry workshop. We’ll begin by watching videos of slam artists like Danez Smith and Patricia Smith, and try our hand at writing and performing slam ourselves. We’ll then read books by Patricia Smith, Claudia Rankine, and Nikki Finney for examples of how poets can write poems that combine passionate social commentary with high literary standards. We’ll end by discussing storytellers archived on The Moth, and we’ll try our hand at writing and performing as storytellers ourselves. Requirements will include a slam poem, five poems in a variety of forms written for workshop feedback, and a story to be performed at the end of class.

CRW 321-001, -002: BOOKS AND PUBLISHING, STAPLES B
An introduction to the culture and commerce of books, this course examines the life cycle of a book; the people and processes involved in book publishing; and the history, business, economics, and ethics of the publishing industry. The class will be broken into formal lectures, given by the professor and invited industry professionals, each Tuesday morning, and smaller, discussion-based sections on Thursdays. Readings, research assignments, and a book auction will help students discover how publishing decisions are made. [Note: This course counts toward the BFA degree and the 12-hour Certificate in Publishing.]

CRW 322-001: EDITING FOR PUBLICATION, BASS T
Required texts: The New Well-Tempered Sentence, by Karen Elizabeth Gordon, and Polishing Your Prose, by Steven M. and Victor L. Cahn. [Recommended but not required: On Writing Well, by William Zinsser.] CRW and PCRW majors only. Prerequisite: CRW 207, 208, or 209. This course will focus on student strategies for editing their own creative writing for precision and clarity. It is not a traditional copyediting course. We will emphasize developing and applying skills in self-editing for grammar, mechanics, spelling, manuscript formatting, style, and other fundamentals crucial to effective, polished writing in the creative writing profession. Students will complete exercises and write/edit work using a series of prompts and assignments. Several exams and homework assignments will make up the grade. An attendance policy will be enforced. [Note: This course is required for the BFA degree and the Certificate in Publishing.]

CRW 323-001: BOOKBUILDING, GRANGER L

CRW 325-001: LITERARY MAGAZINE: Chautauqua, GERARD P
This course is designed to give students a practical magazine publishing experience. Students will read and respond to submissions, work on editing projects, search for possible cover art, and assist with design work. In addition to the work required to build the next issue of Chautauqua, students will have the opportunity to work on marketing and sales projects. We will work in teams – with each group presenting regular updates on their projects and work. Course may be repeated for credit.

CRW 407-001: ADVANCED FICTION WRITING, DE GRAMONT M
In this class, students will work on craft through close reading of each other’s fiction in a workshop format. Students will write two new and original pieces for workshop and revise one of these pieces substantially. Reading assignments will be based on issues that arise during workshops.

CRW 418-001: SCREENWRITING II: FEATURE FILM, HACKLER C
(FST 418) Prerequisites: FST 318 (CRW 318) or consent of instructor. The craft of screenwriting applied to the feature form. Students plan a feature-length screenplay, and write, workshop, and complete the first act.

CRW 460-001: PUBLISHING PRACTICUM: LOOKOUT, STAPLES B
Students must have been accepted into the Certificate in Publishing program in order to receive permission to enroll in the Publishing Practicum.
Prerequisites: CRW 321, 322, 323
Up to five interns support the work of The Publishing Laboratory, with responsibility for editing, designing, and producing the senior BFA anthology in conjunction with CRW 496, the senior seminar. Practicum students work 9 hours weekly in the Lab (including a 2-hour meeting), under faculty supervision. Completion of CRW 321, 322, and 323, with a minimum grade of B in 321 and 322, is a prerequisite for the Practicum. Participants are selected by permission of instructor; a brief application is required. Working hours are scheduled at each student’s convenience during standard Pub Lab hours. May be repeated once for credit.
[Note: This course counts toward the BFA degree and the 12-hour Certificate in Publishing.]

CRW 460-002: PUBLISHING PRACTICUM: LOOKOUT, SMITH E
[Prerequisites: Students must have been accepted into the Certificate in Publishing program and must have completed both CRW 323 and 460-001. Permission of instructor is required.Please write Emily Louise Smithfor permission to register for this course.]
Want to gain experience working for a literary press? A select group of undergraduate students helps with the daily work of the department’s literary imprint, Lookout Books (www.lookout.org). The practical course functions as an internship and provides hands-on experience in our daily operations. Interns assist with the writing of press releases and other promotional materials; research sales and marketing leads; mail review copies and press kits; update our database of review outlets and bookstores; design, produce, and mail promotional materials; assist with maintenance of our website and social media outlets; and attend weekly staff meetings. Lookout practicum students work 8 hours weekly in the Lab (including a 3-hour meeting), under faculty supervision. Participants are selected by permission of instructor on the basis of excellent performance in previous publishing courses and demonstrated interest in the field. CRW 460 may be repeated once for credit. [Note: This course counts toward the BFA degree and the 12-hour Certificate in Publishing.]

CRW 496-001: SENIOR SEMINAR IN WRITING (FICTION AND CREATIVE NONFICTION), HOLMAN V
The Senior Seminar is the capstone course in our BFA program. We have several goals: selection and preparation of your thesis material, creation of your critical preface, and collaboration with the Publishing Laboratory students to create an anthology of student prose. We will also organize your public reading at the end of the semester. In addition, we'll discuss topics such graduate school, publication, and employment. Students should enter the class with a three to five page selection of prose suitable for the anthology.

CRW 496-002: SENIOR SEMINAR IN WRITING, CHAI M
The Senior Seminar is the capstone course in our BFA program. In this course students will prepare their BFA theses, write a critical preface, collaborate with each other and our department’s Publishing Lab to create an anthology of BFA student work, and give a public reading of their own writing.The class will also include discussions of professional issues such as submitting creative work for publication, careers in writing and publishing, and applying to graduate school.

 

 

Fall 2015


CRW 201: INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING
Text: Show & Tell 6th ed.
Introduction to the principles and techniques of creative writing, aimed at developing the creative process. Includes lectures, reading, and writing exercises in poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction. Partially satisfies University Studies II: Approaches and Perspectives/Aesthetic, Interpretive, and Literary Perspectives.

CRW 201-010: INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING, SHUBERT C
Text: Show & Tell 6th Ed., various handouts on Blackboard, and student work.
In this introductory course you will learn the basic terminology, principles, and techniques for writing poetry, fiction, and nonfiction by reading great literary works as well as craft essays by writers, by reflecting on what makes for good writing in reading journals, and by taking brief reading quizzes. Furthermore, you will enhance your knowledge of various online platforms for e-learning as well as hone your "netiquette": that is, how you comport yourself professionally online with your colleagues and instructor. With the aid of online prompts and exercises, you will write your own original material in each genre, which we will critique as a class through blackboard. The course will conclude with a portfolio of your own revised, creative work, from which the bulk of the final grade will be determined. Partially satisfies University Studies II: Approaches and Perspectives/Aesthetic, Interpretive, and Literary Perspectives. Students need be advised that though the online format gives them more flexibility during the week in terms of when they choose to complete activities, they will be penalized for not logging in and fulfilling each weekly assignment by Friday evenings. As such, it is imperative students stay organized and responsible for their work starting Day 1 of the course. No late work will be accepted for credit.

CRW 201-012: INTRO TO CREATIVE WRITING, BUCHANAN L
Text: Show & Tell 6thEd.,various handouts, and student work.
Introduction to the principles and techniques of creative writing in the three major genres: poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction. Coursework is aimed at exploring and developing the student's creative process through readings, class discussions, short writing exercises, and longer finished pieces. Students will read from a variety of contemporary published writers and participate in discussions about these readings, as well in workshops of their peers’ writing. The class concludes with a final portfolio of revised creative work from the semester. This course partially satisfies University Studies II: Approaches and Perspectives/Aesthetic, Interpretive, and Literary Perspectives.

CRW 201-014: INTRO TO CREATIVE WRITING, LUNDIN M
Text: Show & Tell, 6th Edition, various handouts, student work
In this course students will be exposed to the three major genres of creative writing: poetry, nonfiction, and fiction. They will learn the basic principles and terminology required to successfully discuss not only published work, but their own as well. Coursework includes weekly writing prompts, readings, and discussion.

CRW 201-015: INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING, APFELD B
Text: Show & Tell 6th Ed.
This class offers an introduction to the principles and techniques of creative writing in the three major genres: poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction.  Through regular readings and writing exercises, students will develop a critical vocabulary and will begin to explore their own writing aesthetic.  Coursework and assignments will include readings, writing exercises, and workshop sessions; students will submit a final portfolio of revised work.  As a discussion-based class, students are expected to be engaged participants, active listeners, and to attend class regularly.  This course partially satisfies University Studies II: Approaches and Perspectives/Aesthetic, Interpretive, and Literary Perspectives.

CRW 201-016: INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING, BRADFORD J
Text: Show & Tell 6th Ed., various handouts, and student work.
In this introductory course we will discuss the basic terminology, principles, and techniques for writing poetry, fiction, and nonfiction. With the aid of prompts and exercises, you will write your own original material in each genre, which we will discuss in class. The course will conclude with a portfolio of your revised, creative work. Partially satisfies University Studies II: Approaches and Perspectives/Aesthetic, Interpretive, and Literary Perspectives.

CRW 201-017: INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING, WILSON E
Text: Show & Tell 6th Ed., various handouts, and student work.
Offering introductory exploration in poetry, nonfiction, and fiction, this course is designed with two objectives in mind: making students better readers and, subsequently, better writers. Lessons will focus on developing and understanding literary craft, style, and technique; prompted assignments and exercises will focus on challenging students to generate material and then to be able to view it with an editorial eye. The semester’s efforts will culminate in a portfolio composed of revised student work. Special emphasis will be given to creating and maintaining a safe space for all students, both academically and artistically, and to reading work by authors whose diverse identities often exclude them from the literary canon. This course partially satisfies University Studies II: Approaches and Perspectives/Aesthetic, Interpretive, and Literary Perspectives.

CRW 201-018: INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING, PALMER A
Text: Show & Tell 6th Ed., various handouts, and student work
This class offers students an introduction to the principles and techniques of creative writing in poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction. Coursework will focus on developing the student's creative process and knowledge base in each genre and will include reading assignments, writing exercises, and workshop sessions. Over the course of the semester, the student will produce original material in each genre, and will ultimately collect this revised work in a creative portfolio. As a discussion-based class, students are expected to be engaged participants, active listeners, and to attend class regularly. This course partially satisfies University Studies II: Approaches and Perspectives/Aesthetic, Interpretive, and Literary Perspectives.

CRW 201-019: INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING, RAMOS M
Text: Show & Tell 6th Ed., various handouts, and student work.
This class offers an introduction to the basic principles and techniques of creative writing in the three major genres--poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction--and is aimed at developing the student's creative process. Coursework and assignments will include regular readings and writing exercises, workshop sessions, and culminate in a portfolio of revised student work. As a discussion-based class, students are expected to be engaged participants, active listeners, and to attend class regularly. This course partially satisfies University Studies II: Approaches and Perspectives/Aesthetic, Interpretive, and Literary Perspectives.

CRW 201-020: INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING, CLARK C
This course provides an introduction to the basic craft techniques of creative writing in three major genres—fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction—and is aimed at developing the student’s creative process. Students will read a variety of short stories, poems, essays, and memoirs and engage in class discussions. Prompts and writing exercises will be provided inside and outside of class to inspire students to generate their own original material in each genre. Writing workshops in each genre will give students a chance to share their work and receive constructive, supportive feedback. As a discussion-based, creative class, students are expected to be engaged participants, active listeners, and attend class regularly. This course partially satisfies University Studies II: Approaches and Perspectives/Aesthetic, Interpretive, and Literary Perspectives.

CRW 203-001—007: FORMS OF CREATIVE WRITING, FURIA P (AND 2ND-YEAR GTAS)
An introduction to the major forms of creative writing—drama, poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction—through a historical survey from Sophocles through Shakespeare, Pope, Austen, James, and other writers. Written assignments include both creative exercises and analytical essays. Emphasis on learning to read as writers.

CRW 207-001: FICTION WRITING, DIDIER E
In this course, students will learn the fundamentals of fiction writing by examining the work of published writers. We will be reading short stories, craft essays, and some narrative theory. In addition to reading assigned texts, coursework will include weekly writing and revision exercises, journal entries, and a full-length short story, which students will develop over the course of the semester. This course places an emphasis on revision as a creative process, with the ultimate goal being to help students discover and refine their voices as writers, equip them with the language of craft, and to strengthen their sense of the difficult choices writers make in order to create great art.

CRW 207-002: FICTION WRITING, STORY N
Required Texts: The Art Of Fiction by John Gardner and the Scribner Anthology of Contemporary Short Fiction ed. Michael Martone
In this course, students will learn the fundamentals of fiction writing. We will do close readings of short stories, think about craft and process, and write weekly creative exercises, culminating in a full-length short story. Our emphasis will be on experimentation and the production of written work rather than revision. Class participation, attendance, and a willingness to try new things are essential to ensure a quality workshop experience.

CRW 207-003: FICTION WRITING, APFELD B
Texts: 30/30: Thirty American Stories from the Last Thirty Years (Ed. Porter Shreve & B. Minh Nguyen); Writing Fiction: A Guide to Narrative Craft, Janet Burroway
In this class, students will explore the basic elements of fiction writing by both reading widely from published works, and also by writing and revising their own stories.  Students will begin building a critical vocabulary and will become familiar with the technical aspects of fiction, in addition to engaging with the more intangible elements of stories: what draws us to fiction? why do we write it? what does fiction mean for us today?  Coursework includes regular reading assignments and writing exercises, working toward full-length short stories; students will also participate in workshop sessions, and will submit a final portfolio of revised work at the end of the semester.  Participation and attendance are essential, as this is a discussion-based course.  

CRW 208-001: POETRY WRITING, BRADFORD J
Texts: Poet's Choice and A Poet's Glossary, both by Edward Hirsch
This course will serve as an introduction to reading and writing poetry. We will read contemporary poems and essays about the craft of poetry, and discuss the ways in which metaphor, imagery, and sound create tiny bubbles for us to breathe inside. You will also write your own poems, which we will also discuss with an eye toward revision. How do we keep our own bubbles from bursting too early? The class will culminate in a final portfolio of revised poems, accompanied by a final essay in which you will reflect on how your own sense of craft has grown over the course of the semester.

CRW 208-002: POETRY WRITING, CLARK C
In this craft workshop, students will explore the fundamentals of poetry writing through writing exercises and readings of contemporary poems, craft essays, and other pertinent texts. Poetry workshops will allow students to receive constructive and encouraging feedback on one another’s poems. A creative broadside project will allow students to examine a published poem of their choosing through the lens of a different artistic medium such as collage, painting, sculpture, music, film, etc. Each student will revise their workshopped poems as part of a final portfolio, which will also include a short personal craft essay on their poetic development over the course of the semester. Required texts will include The Poet’s Companion (1997) and The Penguin Anthology of 20th Century American Poetry.

CRW 209-001: CREATIVE NONFICTION, PALMER A
Texts: Keep It Real by Lee Gutkind; Touchstone Anthology of Contemporary Creative Nonfiction edited by Lex Williford and Michael Martone.
Some writers have described creative nonfiction as “the art of truth”; others, a genre of “true stories well told.” This introductory, discussion-based course will approach creative nonfiction in terms of truth, as well as imagination and craft. Students will learn what distinguishes creative nonfiction as a genre and develop their skills as nonfiction writers by completing a variety of writing and reading assignments that inform these objectives. Coursework will focus on personal essay, lyric essay, and memoir/personal narrative, but will also include writing exercises and assignments in other forms (e.g., journalism, science writing, and travel writing). In addition, students will complete in-class exercises and respond to each other’s creative work via the workshop component of the class.

CRW 209-002: CREATIVE NONFICTION, RAMOS M
Texts: On Writing Well: The Classic Guide to Writing Nonfiction by William Zinsser; The Best Creative Nonfiction Vol. 1 edited by Lee Gutkind.
What is creative nonfiction? What's the difference between a news story and creative nonfiction? An analytical essay and a personal one? Why do people read creative nonfiction at all? Creative nonfiction writers share their personal truth in the context of fact, taking inspiration from fiction, journalism, and poetry. In this introductory, discussion-based course, we will read and write extensively, learn to identify our own stories, and find engaging, unique ways to tell them. We will also complete in-class exercises and respond to each others' essays via the workshop.

CRW 305-001: THE CREATIVE PROCESS, GASKILL M
Prerequisite or corequisite: CRW 206, 207, 208 or 209 or consent of instructor.
Investigation through reading, lectures, discussions, writing, and exercises of the creative process in general and its particular application to literary art; a study of creative geniuses and creative madness. Readings include studies of the creative process in a variety of other disciplines.

CRW 306-001: FORMS OF FICTION, DE GRAMONT M
In this class, we will read novels and short stories with an eye toward applying what we learn toward our own work. This is primarily a reading and discussion class, and as such attendance is crucial. In addition to critical responses, students will write creatively in response to the reading. Students will turn in a final revised exercise and a longer essay at the end of the class.

CRW 307-001 INTERMEDIATE FICTION WRITING, CHAI M
Texts: Best American Short Stories 2012, edited by Tom Perrotta, as well as supplementary texts as handouts or pdfs.
In this class students will have the opportunity to practice various elements of craft in the tradition of literary fiction. Each week students will read assigned short stories, excerpts from novels, and other prose pieces for discussion of craft and aesthetic choices. Students will respond with their own creative pieces and receive feedback from the class, which they will use for revision. In addition to their original creative work and feedback for classmates, on occasion students may be asked to write a page or two of reflection on how readings, exercises, and discussions have affected their writing process.

CRW 307-002 INTERMEDIATE FICTION WRITING, WATSON L
Donald Barthelme said, “The aim of literature . . . is the creation of a strange object covered with fur which breaks your heart.” In this course we will break hearts with our writing. You will build on the fiction writing skills you’ve already learned, and in addition, you will learn to read like a writer. You will learn your strengths as writer, and via class discussion and the process of revision, you will learn how to improve your own writing, kill all your darlings, make your work break hearts, etc. This is a workshop based course in which we will analyze and discuss up to three pieces of your own writing, as well as discuss short fiction that will be handed out in class.

CRW 315-001: BEYOND THE BFA, BASS T
“What am I going to do with a degree in creative writing?” You might ask that question often. And if you don’t, perhaps your parents do. This course will seek to respond to that important question. CRW 315: Beyond the BFA will examine the prospects for life for creative writers after college. We’ll focus on career options for creative writers, looking not only at graduate school applications but also job searches, writing the résumé, interviewing for jobs, submitting creative work for publication, and considering alternative paths to careers (such as the Master of Arts in Teaching degree at UNCW, teaching abroad, joining the Peace Corps, or taking professional internships). Students will be expected to produce several writing projects, including a résumé, cover letter, creative writing samples, and submissions for publication. Expect also to connect with the Career Center. The Department of Creative Writing attendance policy will be enforced. The course will count either as elective credit for the BFA degree, or in the literature category.

CRW 318-001: SCREENWRITING I: INTRODUCTION, LINEHAN T
(FST 318) Prerequisite: PCRW, PFST, CRW, or FST major; and CRW 207, CRW 208, CRW 209, or FST 201 or permission of instructor. Theory and practice of screenplays and/or documentary scripts for television and film with an emphasis on the fundamentals of narrative structure. Students write original scripts, including a short screenplay for possible use in FST 495.

CRW 318-002: SCREENWRITING I: INTRODUCTION, HACKLER C
(FST 318 ) Prerequisite or corequisite: FST 201 ; or prerequisite: PCRW, CRW and CRW 207 , CRW 208 or CRW 209 ; or permission of instructor. Theory and practice of screenwriting with an emphasis on the fundamentals of narrative structure. Students write original scripts, including a short screenplay for possible use in FST 495.

CRW 318-003: SCREENWRITING I: INTRODUCTION, BUTTINO L
(FST 318 ) Prerequisite or corequisite: FST 201 ; or prerequisite: PCRW, CRW and CRW 207 , CRW 208 or CRW 209 ; or permission of instructor. Theory and practice of screenwriting with an emphasis on the fundamentals of narrative structure. Students write original scripts, including a short screenplay for possible use in FST 495.

CRW 320-001: WRITERS’ WEEK FALL 2014, GESSNER D
This two-credit intensive course was designed to complement Writers’ Week. The week will consist of workshop sessions, panels, readings, and an individual manuscript conference with MFA program students or alumni. Students will meet to familiarize themselves with the work of our visiting writers and to learn the ins and outs of organizing the week. As a group, we are responsible for keeping the week itself running smoothly. Class members will participate in the many facets of the week, from introducing the writers at readings to driving them around town. Students are expected to attend a total of 15 event-hours over the course of the symposium.

CRW 320-002: CREATIVE NONFICTION WORKSHOP: WRITING THE OUTSIDER, CHAI M
In this class students will study a number of forms of creative nonfiction including lyric essays, personal essays, memoir, and narrative nonfiction that includes research. Students will also have the opportunity to write creative pieces in these different forms and receive feedback from the class, which they will use for revision. In addition to their original creative work and feedback for classmates, on occasion students may be asked to write a page or two of reflection on how readings, exercises, and discussions have affected their writing process.
As our theme we will examine how established authors have tackled the task of “writing the outsider,” that is, exploring perspectives that may not be well represented, if at all, in the mainstream media now or in the past. What does it mean to feel like an outsider, whether because of race, socioeconomic class, gender, sexual orientation, physical ability, religion, identity (ethnic/national/regional), historical marginalization, or other factors? How does one write to express a truth that may not be recognized by one’s peers? How does one center this material to allow the reader access to this perspective? We will be reading works by many authors who have grappled with these ideas including Elizabeth Alexander, Sherman Alexie, James Baldwin, Roxane Gay, Jamaica Kincaid, Walter Kirn, lê thi diem thúy, David Sedaris, Cheryl Strayed, Luis Alberto Urrea, and Terry Tempest Williams, among others.

CRW 320-003: A STUDY OF THE IMAGE IN POETRY, MORLING M
What is an image and how does it occur? Pound defined it as: “…an intellectual and emotional complex in an instant of time.” Gogol said: “The function of the image is to express life itself, not ideas or arguments about life.” In this class we will study the image in poetry but also look at photography and film. We will write and workshop poems with the aim of exploring and developing our own innate sense of the image and its possibilities because as Pound concludes: “It is the presentation of such a ‘complex’ instantaneously which gives the sense of sudden liberation; that sense of freedom from time limits and space limits; that sense of sudden growth, which we experience in the presence of the greater works of art.”

CRW 322-001: EDITING FOR PUBLICATION, BASS T
Required texts: The New Well-Tempered Sentence, by Karen Elizabeth Gordon, and Polishing Your Prose, by Steven M. and Victor L. Cahn. [Recommended but not required: On Writing Well, by William Zinsser.] CRW and PCRW majors only. Prerequisite: CRW 207, 208, or 209. This course will focus on student strategies for editing their own creative writing for precision and clarity. It is not a traditional copyediting course. We will emphasize developing and applying skills in self-editing for grammar, mechanics, spelling, manuscript formatting, style, and other fundamentals crucial to effective, polished writing in the creative writing profession. Students will complete exercises and write/edit work using a series of prompts and assignments. Several exams and homework assignments will make up the grade. An attendance policy will be enforced. [Note: This course is required for the BFA degree and the Certificate in Publishing.]

CRW 324-001: CHAUTAUQUA LITERARY JOURNAL, GERARD P
This course is designed to give students a practical magazine publishing experience. Students will read and respond to submissions,work on a developmental editing projects, search for possible cover art, and assist with design work. In addition to the work required to build the next issue of Chautauqua, students will have the opportunity to work on marketing and sales projects. We will work in teams – with each group presenting regular updates on their projects and work. Course may be repeated for credit.

CRW 324-002: SPECIAL TOPICS IN PUBLISHING: THE HANDMADE BOOK, PHILLIPS A
What can visual practice offer the creative writer, in terms of the writing process, engagement with audience, and marketing one’s work? When do the two mediums support each other, and when do they fail in doing so? This course explores the intersection of the visual/tactile object and the printed word. We will consider artists’ books, binding techniques, broadsides, printed ephemera, visual poetry, altered books and erasures, and other visual forms, all in light of literary practice. We will also investigate the history of such objects in the context of small-press culture and the little-magazines tradition. Toward these ends, we will actively seek out and review both historical and current examples of such work, and we will experiment with making our own. Schedule permitting, we will visit the studio of a letterpress printer or book artist who works with text, and guest speakers will broaden our perspective on design principles for such work. Students will leave the course with a fuller sense of the history of text-image intersections and the creative potential to be found in collaborations between language and the visual, as well as with a range of skills and techniques for creating handmade and limited-edition works.

CRW 407-001: ADVANCED FICTION WRITING, DE GRAMONT M
In this class, students will work on craft through close reading of each other’s fiction in a workshop format. Students will write two new and original pieces for workshop and revise one of these pieces substantially. Reading assignments will be based on issues that arise during workshops.

CRW 407-002: ADVANCED WORKSHOP IN FICTION, SIEGEL R
An advanced workshop focused on literary fiction. Course will stress the exploration of craft and the building of writing skills through exercises and two short stories. The class will also read, write about, and discuss published literary fiction. Prerequisite: CRW 307.

CRW 418-001: SCREENWRITING II: WRITING THE FEATURE FILM, HACKLER F
(FST 418) Prerequisites: FST 318 (CRW 318) or consent of instructor. The craft of screenwriting applied to the feature form. Students plan a feature-length screenplay, and write, workshop, and complete the first act.

CRW 419-001: SCREENWRITING III: FILM ADAPTATION, HACKLER F
(FST 419) The art of adapting literary works into short screenplays. Emphasis on maximizing dramatic and cinematic potential of source material.

CRW 460-001: PUBLISHING PRACTICUM, STAPLES B
Students must have been admitted to the certificate program in order to receive permission to enroll in the publishing practicum. Prerequisite: CRW 321, 322, 323 A select group of students support the work of The Publishing Laboratory, with responsibility for editing, designing, and producing books and other publications. Undergraduate practicum students work 9 hours weekly in the Lab (including a 1.5 hour staff meeting), under faculty supervision. Completion of CRW 321, 322, and 323, with a minimum grade of B in 321 or 322, is a prerequisite for the Practicum. Participants are selected by permission of instructor; a brief application is required. Working hours are scheduled at each student’s convenience during standard Pub Lab hours. May be repeated once for credit.

CRW 496-002: SENIOR SEMINAR IN PROSE, HOLMAN V
The Senior Seminar is the capstone course in our BFA program. We have several critical goals: selection and preparation of your thesis material, creation of your critical preface, collaborating with the Publishing Laboratory students to create an anthology of prose, and preparing for your public reading at the end of the semester. Students should enter the class with a three to five page selection of prose suitable for the anthology.

 

BFA Course Descriptions Archive


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